Kakapada, Kākapāda, Kākapada, Kaka-pada: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Kakapada means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Kākapada (काकपद) refers to a “crow’s feet” sign made on the head, which is the prescribed appearance for jesters (vidūṣaka), according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 23. It is composed of the words kuñcita (curved) and mūrdhaja (hair of the head). Providing masks is a component of nepathya (costumes and make-up) and is to be done in accordance with the science of āhāryābhinaya (extraneous representation).

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Kakapada in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Kākapāda (काकपाद) is the name of a leader of Gaṇas (Gaṇapa or Gaṇeśvara or Gaṇādhipa) who came to Kailāsa, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.20. Accordingly, after Śiva decided to become the friend of Kubera:—“[...] The leaders of Gaṇas revered by the whole world and of high fortune arrived there. [...] Another (leader of Gaṇas) Kākapāda with six crores and the lord Santānaka with six crores, Mahābala, Madhupiṅga and Piṅgala each with nine crores. [...]”.

These [viz., Kākapāda] and other leaders of Gaṇas [viz., Gaṇapas] were all powerful (mahābala) and innumerable (asaṃkhyāta). [...] The Gaṇa chiefs and other noble souls of spotless splendour eagerly reached there desirous of seeing Śiva. Reaching the spot they saw Śiva, bowed to and eulogised him.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Kākapada (काकपद):—[kākapadaṃ] If there is no remedy for poisoning, it is the last line of treatment, in which incision is made on the scalp of the shape of crow’s feet, and on that the medicine is kept.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Kākapada or Kākapāda.—(SII 2), name of a flaw in diamonds; a mark indicating omission of letters written outside the line. Note: kākapada is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kakapada in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kākapāda : (m.) crow's foot; cross mark.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kākapāda refers to: crow’s foot or footmark Vism. 179 (as pattern);

Note: kākapāda is a Pali compound consisting of the words kāka and pāda.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kākapada (काकपद).—n (S kāka Crow, pada Foot. From the resemblance. ) The mark v showing where something interlined should be read, a caret.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kākapada (काकपद).—n A caret.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kākapada (काकपद).—[neuter] a crow’s foot.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kākapada (काकपद):—[=kāka-pada] [from kāka] n. the mark of a crow’s foot or a similar mark or figure, [Suśruta; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

2) [v.s. ...] marks or lines in the skin similar to a crow’s foot, [Suśruta]

3) [v.s. ...] the foundation or base of anything so shaped, [Jyotiṣa]

4) [v.s. ...] the sign V in [manuscripts] marking an omission

5) [v.s. ...] a particular flourish of the pen indicating an oft-recurring word

6) [v.s. ...] m. a modus coeundi, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

[Sanskrit to German]

Kakapada in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kākapada (ಕಾಕಪದ):—

1) [noun] = ಕಾಕಪಾದ - [kakapada -] 1 & 2.

2) [noun] a particular mode or position in sexual intercourse.

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Kākapāda (ಕಾಕಪಾದ):—

1) [noun] a crow’s foot.

2) [noun] the sign ' ^ ' used in writing to denote something left out but to be inserted.

3) [noun] a particular kind of defect in gems.

4) [noun] one of the six types of rythmic cycle in Karnāṭaka music system.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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