Kahala, Kāhala: 19 definitions

Introduction:

Kahala means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Kāhala (काहल).—In Rama's abhiṣeka.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 4. 100.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Kāhala (काहल) refers to a “kind of musical instrument, which sound is same as to cocks sound” and is a synonym (another name) for the Kukkuṭa, according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

1) Kāhala (काहल) refers to a “trumpet” and represents one of the items held in the right hand of Heruka: one of the main deities of the Herukamaṇḍala described in the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Heruka is positioned in the Lotus (padma) at the center; He is the origin of all heroes; He has 17 faces (with three eyes on each) and 76 arms [holding, for example, kāhala]; He is half black and half green in color; He is dancing on a flaming sun placed on Bhairava and Kālarātrī.

2) Kāhala (काहल) is the name of a Vīra (hero) who, together with the Ḍākinī named Kāhalī forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Ākāśacakra, according to the same work. Accordingly, the ākāśacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the dharma-puṭa (‘dharma layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs and Vīras [viz., Kāhala] are dark blue in color; they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Kāhalā (काहला) refers to a kind of flute, according to chapter 1.2 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism. Accordingly, “[...] Then some gods beat loudly drums that made the mountains of the gods reverberate with loud echoes from caves. [...] Some gods, standing on the top of the rock, blew kāhalās having a powerful sound like cowherds blowing cow-horns. [...]”.

Note: Kāhalā is defined in the Nāṭyadarpaṇa as being made of pure copper, hollow in the middle.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Kāhala or Kāhalā.—(EI 24; IA 15), a musical instrument; a trumpet. See kākala. Note: kāhala is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kāhāḷa (काहाळ).—n f (Poetry. kāhala or kāhalā S) An ancient instrument of music, according to some, Cymbals, but, more probable, a horn. Ex. mōharī pāṃvē śiṅgēṃ vāhilyā kāhāḷā || dēkhilā sāṃvaḷā brahmā- dikīṃ ||.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kāhala (काहल).—a.

1) Dry, withered.

2) Mischievous.

3) Excessive, spacious, large.

-laḥ 1 A cat.

2) A cock.

3) A crow.

4) A sound in general.

-lam 1 Indistinct speech.

2) A kind of musical instrument; गायन्तीभिः काहलं काहलाभिः (gāyantībhiḥ kāhalaṃ kāhalābhiḥ) Śi.18.54.

-lam ind. Very much, excessively; Śi.18.54.

-lā A large drum (military).

-lī A young woman.

-laḥ. -lā, -lam A horn.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Kāhala (काहल).—adj. (in this meaning only Prakrit according to Hemacandra i.214, 254), downcast, fainthearted (= kātara, Hemacandra): mā °lo bhava Mūla-Sarvāstivāda-Vinaya ii.20.11; so Tibetan, mi dgyes par ma mdzad cig.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāhala (काहल).—mfn.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) 1. Dry, withered. 2. Mischievous. 3. Large, excessive. f. (-lī) 1. One of the Apsaras or courtezans of Indra'S heaven. 2. The sound of any tube, pipe or musical instrument.

(-lā) A young woman. mf.

(-laḥ-lā) A horn, either a cow horn, or an instrument of that shape. m.

(-laḥ) 1. A cock. 2. Sound in general. 3. A cat. n.

(-laṃ) Indistinct speech. adv. Much, excessively. E. ka pleasure, the head, &c. hal to plough or divide, with āṅ prefixed, affix ac.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāhala (काहल).—m. A large drum, [Pañcatantra] 20, 8. f. A musical instrument, probably a large drum, [Rājataraṅgiṇī] 5, 464.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāhala (काहल).—[adjective] improper, unbecoming (speech); [masculine] a large drum, [feminine] ā a cert. wind-instrument.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Kāhala (काहल) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—on music. See Kohala. Quoted by Mallinātha on Kumārasambhava 7, 91.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kāhala (काहल):—mfn. speaking unbecomingly, [Hemacandra’s Yoga-śāstra]

2) speaking indistinctly, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) mischievous, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) large, excessive, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) dry, withered, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) m. a large drum, [Pañcatantra]

7) a sound, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) a cat, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) a cock, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) Name of an author

11) Kāhalā (काहला):—[from kāhala] f. a kind of musical instrument, [Rājataraṅgiṇī v, 464]

12) [v.s. ...] Name of an Apsaras, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) Kāhala (काहल):—n. unbecoming speech, [Sāma-vidhāna-brāhmaṇa]

14) a kind of musical instrument, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāhala (काहल):—[(laḥ-lā-laṃ) a.] Dry; mischievous; large. 1. m. A cock; a sound; a cat. f. lī a celestial courtezan; sound of a pipe. f. lā a young woman. m. f. (laḥ-lā) A horn. n. (laṃ) Indistinct speech.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Kāhala (काहल) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Kāhala, Kāhalā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kahala in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Kāhala (काहल) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Kātara.

2) Kāhala (काहल) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Kāhala.

3) Kāhalā (काहला) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Kāhalā.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kāhala (ಕಾಹಲ):—[noun] = ಕಾಹಳೆ [kahale].

--- OR ---

Kāhala (ಕಾಹಲ):—

1) [noun] a cat.

2) [noun] a cock; a rooster.

3) [noun] a crow.

4) [noun] a sound in gen.

--- OR ---

Kāhaḷa (ಕಾಹಳ):—[noun] = ಕಾಹಳೆ [kahale].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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