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Kadamba, aka: Kadambā, Kādamba; 9 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kadamba means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Dharmaśāstra (religious law)

Kadamba (कदम्ब) is a Sanskrit word, identified with Nauclea cadamba by various scholars in their translation of the Śukranīti. This tree is mentioned as bearing good fruits. The King should plant such domestic plants in and near villages. He should nourish them by stoole of goats, sheep and cows, water as well as meat.

The following is an ancient Indian recipe for such nourishment of trees:

According to Śukranīti 4.4.105-109: “The trees (such as kadamba) are to be watered in the morning and evening in summer, every alternate day in winter, in the fifth part of the day (i.e., afternoon) in spring, never in the rainy season. If trees have their fruits destroyed, the pouring of cold water after being cooked together with Kulutha, Māṣa (seeds), Mudga (pulse), Yava (barley) and Tila (oil seed) would lead to the growth of flowers and fruits. Growth of trees can be helped by the application of water with which fishes are washed and cleansed.”

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
context information

Dharmaśāstra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharma-shastra) is a category of Hindu literature containing important instructions regarding religious law, ethics, economics, jurisprudence and more. It is categorised as smṛti, an important and authorative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

Śaivism (Śaiva philosophy)

Kadambā (कदम्बा):—Another name for Saumyā, the Sanskrit name for one of the twenty-four goddesses of the Sūryamaṇḍala, according to the tantric sources called the Śrīmatottara-tantra and the kubjikāmata-tantra.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantraŚaivism book cover
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Śaiva (शैव, shaiva) or Śaivism (shaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Śiva as the supreme being. Closeley related to Śāktism, Śaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Āyurveda (science of life)

1) Kādamba (कादम्ब) is a Sanskrit word referring either to the “grey goose” or to the “whistling teal”. The meat of this animal is part of the māṃsavarga (‘group of flesh’), which is used throughout Āyurvedic literature. The animal Kādamba is part of the sub-group named Ambucārin, refering to animals “which move on waters”. It was classified by Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic properties of the substance.

2) Kadamba (चिर्भट) is a Sanskrit word referring to Neolamarckia cadamba (burflower-tree), a plant species in the Rubiaceae family. Certain plant parts of Kadamba are eaten as a vegetable (śāka), according to Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work. The plant is therefore part of the Śākavarga group of medicinal plants, referring to the “group of vegetables/pot-herbs”. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic value of the plant. The plant has the following commonly used botanical synonym: Nauclea cadamba, Anthocephalus indicus, Anthocephalus chinensis.

According to the Rājanighaṇṭu (verse 9.97), the burflower-tree (kadamba) has 7 synonyms: Vṛttapuṣpa, Surabhi, Lalanāpriya, Kādambarya, Sindhupuṣpa, Madāḍhya and Karṇapūraka. The same work also lists 3 sub-varieties: Dhārākadamba, Dhūlikadamba and Bhūmikadamba.

Properties according to the Caraka-saṃhitā: Kadamba is non-slimy, heavy, cold and channel-blocking.

Properties according to the Rājanighaṇṭu: Kadamba is pungent, bitter, astringent and subsides vitiated vāta. This is cooling and alleviates the pain caused by pitta and kapha. It improves the quantitative uality of semen.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Kādamba (कादम्ब)—Sanskrit word for a bird Anser indicus or Anser anser (“black”). This animal is from the group called Plava (‘those which float’ or ‘those move about in large flocks’). Plava itself is a sub-group of the group of animals known as Ānupa (those that frequent marshy places).

Source: archive.org: Sushruta samhita, Volume I
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

General definition (in Hinduism)

Śrīla Viśvanātha Cakravartī gives the following information about Vṛndāvana's trees: The kadamba proper has smaller flowers and a very pleasant fragrance. (Śrīmad Bhāgavatam 10.30.9).

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

In Buddhism

Pali

1) Kādamba, (cp. Sk. kādamba) a kind of goose with grey wings J. V, 420; VvA. 163. (Page 203)

2) Kadamba, (cp. Sk. kadamba) the kadamba tree, Nauclea cordifolia (with orange-coloured, fragrant blossoms) J. VI, 535, 539; Vism. 206; DhA. I, 309 (°puppha); Mhvs 25, 48 (id.). (Page 185)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

kadamba : (m.) the tree Nauclea Cordiforlia. || kādamba (m.), a kind of goose with grey wings.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English DictionaryPali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

1. Kadamba, Kadambaka - The river that flows past Anuradhapura, on the eastern side, now called the Malvatu Oya (Mhv.vii.43; and Trs.58, n.3). Near the river was the Nivatta cetiya (Mhv.xv.10). The river ford, the Gangalatittha (MT.361), formed the beginning of the boundary line of the sima of the Mahavihara, and this line also ended at the river bank (Mhv.xv.191). The road from Anuradhapura to Cetiyagiri lay across the Kadamba nadi, and pious kings, such as Maha Dathika Maha Naga, spread carpets from the river up to the mountain so that pilgrims could wash their feet in the river and approach the mountain shrines with clean feet (Mhv.xxxiv.78).

The road from the Kadamba river to Thuparama passed through the Rajamatudvara (SA.i.173). Moggallana II. dammed up the river among the mountains and thus formed three tanks, the Pattapasanavapi, the Dhanavapi, and the Garitara (Cv.xli.61), and Udaya II. built a weir for the overflow of the river (Cv.li.130).

In the time of Kakusandha Buddha, the capital of Ceylon, Abhayanagara, lay to the east of Kadambanadi (Mhv.xv.59; Dpv.xv.39; xvii.12; see also Mbv.120, 134f).

See also Kalamba.

2. Kadamba - A mountain near Himava. Seven Pacceka Buddhas once lived there. Ap.ii.382.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Kadamba (कदम्ब) is the name of a gandharva god according to both the Digambara and the Śvetāmbara traditions. The gandharvas refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas). The gandharvas have a golden appearance according to the Digambaras and the Tumbaru tree is their caitya-vṛkṣa (sacred-tree). They have a blackish complexion and are beautiful in appearance, have excellent physiognomy, sweet voices and are adorned with crowns and neckalces according to the Śvetāmbaras.

The deities such as Kadamba are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

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Search found 119 books containing Kadamba, Kadambā or Kādamba. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the 20 most relevant articles:

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