Jyotsna, Jyotsnā: 16 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Jyotsna means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना, “Moonlight”):—Third of the eight Mātṛs born from the body of Śaśinī, according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra. These eight sub-manifestations (mātṛ), including Jyotsnā, symbolize a connection to the moon. They are presided over by the Bhairava Krodha and his consort Vaiṣṇavī. Śaśinī is the third of the Eight Mahāmātṛs, residing within the Mātṛcakra (third of the five cakras) and represents the moon.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of jyotsna in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Jyotsna (ज्योत्स्न) refers to the “bright one”, and is used to describe Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.41.—Accordingly, as Viṣṇu and others eulogized Śiva:—“[...] obeisance to Śiva who is calm, the supreme and the highest soul, of matted hair, great lord and the bright one (jyotsna). You are the creator of the creators of the universe. You are the sustainer and the forefather, possessed of three attributes and attributeless. You are greater than primordial nature and the supreme Being”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना).—A river from the Sarayū (or Mānasa?).*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 18. 71.

1b) A kala of the moon.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 35. 92.

1c) A tanu of Prajāpati; men created from it were all delightful beings; of satva quality.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 9. 20; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 8. 21.

1d) A R. from the Śveta.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 47. 68.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of jyotsna in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना).—(Ι) name of a commentary by Rāmacandra possibly belonging to the 18th century on the Vājasaneyi Prātiśākhya; (2) name of a commentary on Nāgeśa's 'Laghuśabdenduśekhara by Udayaṃakara Pāṭhaka of Vārāṇasi in the 18th century.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

Discover the meaning of jyotsna in the context of Vyakarana from relevant books on Exotic India

Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Journal of the University of Bombay Volume V: Apabhramsa metres (2)

Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना) is the name of a catuṣpadi metre (as popularly employed by the Apabhraṃśa bards), as discussed in books such as the Chandonuśāsana, Kavidarpaṇa, Vṛttajātisamuccaya and Svayambhūchandas.—Jyotsnā has 13 mātrās in each of its four lines (5, 5, IS).—Note: Khaṇḍa, Saṃgalitā, Padagalitā, Sundarāgalitā, Jyotsnā Upakhaṇḍa and Uddohaka are but other names of the Apsarovilasita.—[Apsarovilasita has 13 mātrās in each of its four lines, divided into the groups of 6, 4 and 3 mātrās or 4, 4 and 5 mātrās or 5, 5 and 3 mātrās.]

Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

Discover the meaning of jyotsna in the context of Chandas from relevant books on Exotic India

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

1) Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना) is the name of Vidyārājñī (i.e., “wisdom queen”) mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Jyotsnā).

2) Jyotsna (ज्योत्स्न) is the name of a Rāśi (zodiac sign) mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

Discover the meaning of jyotsna in the context of Tibetan Buddhism from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना).—[jyotirastyasyāṃ jyotiṣa upadhālopo naśca pratyayaḥ P.V.2.114 Sk.]

1) Moonlight; स्फुरत्स्फारज्योत्स्ना- धवलिततले क्वापि पुलिने (sphuratsphārajyotsnā- dhavalitatale kvāpi puline) Bh.3.42; ज्योत्स्नावतो निर्विशति प्रदोषान् (jyotsnāvato nirviśati pradoṣān) R.6.34.

2) Light (in general).

3) An epithet of Durgā.

4) A moonlight-night.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना).—f.

(-tsnā) 1. Moonlight. 2. Amoonlight night. 3. A small cucumber: see jyotsnī. E. jyotis light, ta affix, and the penultimate rejected, deriv. irr. fem. affix ṭāp; also with ṅiṣ, jyotsnī q. v.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना).—i. e. jyut + sna, f. 1. Moonlight, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 4, 28, 34. 2. Light, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 3, 28, 21 (pl.) 3. The name of a body of Brahman, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 3, 20, 39.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना).—[feminine] moonlight night, moonshine.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—a
—[commentary] on Hiraṇyakeśikalpasūtra. L. 1505.
—by Gopīnātha Bhaṭṭa. Np. Vi, 8.

2) Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना):—a
—[commentary] on the Vājasaneyiprātiśākhya, by Rāmacandra.

3) Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना):—Haṭhadīpikāṭīkā by Brahmānanda. L. 513.

4) Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना):—Śabdenduśekharaṭīkā. B. 3, 26. Kāṭm. 9.
—by Udayaṃkara. K. 82. Bhk. 28.

5) Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना):—Haṭhadīpikāṭīkā. read L. 1513.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना):—[from jyut] f. ([Pāṇini 5-2, 114]) a moonlight night, [Taittirīya-brāhmaṇa ii, 2, 9, 7]

2) [v.s. ...] moonlight, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc. (ifc. f(ā). , [Kathāsaritsāgara cvii])

3) [v.s. ...] [plural] light, splendour, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa iii, 28, 21]

4) [v.s. ...] one of Brahmā’s bodies, 20, 39

5) [v.s. ...] one of the moon’s 16 Kalās, [Brahma-purāṇa ii, 15]

6) [v.s. ...] Durgā, [DevīP.; Devī-māhātmya]

7) [v.s. ...] the plant jyotsnī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc. [Scholiast or Commentator]]

8) [v.s. ...] the plant ghoṣātakī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना):—(tsnā) 1. f. Moonlight.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना):—(von jyotis) f. [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 5, 2, 114.] oxyt. Sch. parox. [Taittirīyabrāhmaṇa]

1) eine mondhelle Nacht [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 2, 266.] [Medinīkoṣa Nalopākhyāna 8.] Gegens. tamisrā [Taittirīyabrāhmaṇa 2, 2, 9, 7.] —

2) Mondschein [Amarakoṣa 1, 1, 2, 18.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 107.] [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] [Medinīkoṣa] [Sāvitryupākhyāna 5, 106.] prāvaraṇaścendurdṛśyate hyudito mbare [Rāmāyaṇa 3, 5, 10. 22, 14. 69, 1.] [Suśruta 1, 5, 3. 114, 6.] [Pañcatantra 162, 10. V, 42.] na hi saṃharate jyotsṇāṃ candraścāṇḍālaveśmani [Hitopadeśa I, 55.] anvadhāvata pāṇḍyeśaṃ jyotsneva rajanīkaram [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 4, 28, 34.] purāṇapūrṇacandreṇa śrutijyotsnāḥ prakāśitāḥ [Mahābhārata 1, 86.] Licht, heller Schein überh., pl. [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 3, 28, 21.] Bez. eines der Körper Brahman's [Viṣṇupurāṇa 40.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 3, 20, 39.] —

3) N. einer der 16 Kalā des Mondes [Brahmapurāṇa] in [Oxforder Handschriften 18],b. —

4) Beiname der Durgā [Devīpurāṇa] und [DEVĪM. im Śabdakalpadruma] —

5) Name zweier Pflanzen: a) = jyotsnī [SVĀMIN] zu [Amarakoṣa 2, 4, 4, 6.] [Śabdakalpadruma] — b) = ghoṣātakī [Ratnamālā 65.]

--- OR ---

Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना):—

2) sajyotsnā adj. mit Mondschein versehen [Kathāsaritsāgara 107, 39.] —

6) Titel eines Commentars [HALL 69.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना):—f.

1) eine mondhelle Nacht.

2) Mondschein. Am Ende eines adj. Comp. f. ā. —

3) Pl. Licht , heller Schein.

4) Bez. eines der Körper Brahman's.

5) Name einer der 16 Kalā des Mondes.

6) Beiname der Durgā. —

7) *eine Gurkenart und * = ghoṣātakī. —

8) Titel eines Commentars.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of jyotsna in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Jyotsna in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Jyotsnā (ज्योत्स्ना):—(nf) the moonlight.

context information

...

Discover the meaning of jyotsna in the context of Hindi from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: