Jrimbhaka, Jṛmbhaka: 6 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Jrimbhaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Jṛmbhaka can be transliterated into English as Jrmbhaka or Jrimbhaka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous (J) next»] — Jrimbhaka in Shaktism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Jṛmbhaka (जृम्भक) refers to one of the 53 gods to be worshipped and given pāyasa (rice boiled in milk) according to the Vāstuyāga rite in Śaktism (cf. Śāradātilaka-tantra III-V). The worship of these 53 gods happens after assigning them to one of the 64 compartment while constructing a Balimaṇḍapa. Vāstu is the name of a prodigious demon, who was killed by 53 gods (eg., Jṛmbhaka).

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous (J) next»] — Jrimbhaka in Jainism glossary
Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Jṛmbhaka (जृम्भक) refers to deities and servants of Kubera, according to chapter 1.2 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous (J) next»] — Jrimbhaka in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jṛmbhaka (जृम्भक).—[jṛmbh-ṣvul]

1) 'A yawner', a sort of demon; जृम्भकैर्यक्षरक्षोभिः स्रग्विभिः समलङ्कृतः (jṛmbhakairyakṣarakṣobhiḥ sragvibhiḥ samalaṅkṛtaḥ) Mb.3.231.34.

-kam Swelling.

Derivable forms: jṛmbhakaḥ (जृम्भकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jṛmbhaka (जृम्भक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A subordinate deity. 2. A yawner. E. jṛbhi, and ṇvul aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jṛmbhaka (जृम्भक).—[jṛmbh + aka], I. m. 1. The name of certain demons, Mahābhārata 3, 14548. 2. The name of a spell, producing drowsiness, [Rāmāyaṇa] 1, 30, 7. Ii. f. bhikā, Yawning, Mahābhārata 5, 282. Iii. n. Swelling, [Lassen, Anthologia Sanskritica.] 17, 4.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jṛmbhaka (जृम्भक):—[from jṛmbh] m. ‘yawner’, a sort of spirit or demon, [Mahābhārata iii, 14548; Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi i, 9, 183]

2) [v.s. ...] (= jambh) Name of certain magical formularies for exorcising the evil spirits supposed to possess weapons, [Rāmāyaṇa i, 30, 7]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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