Jnanashakti, Jñānaśakti, Jnana-shakti: 5 definitions

Introduction:

Jnanashakti means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Jñānaśakti can be transliterated into English as Jnanasakti or Jnanashakti, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Elements of Hindu Iconograpy

Jñānaśakti (ज्ञानशक्ति):—Fourth of the five Śakti to evolve, at saṃhāra (the end of an aeonic destruction). It is also known as Pratiṣṭhāśakti, because it yokes to the puruṣa-tattvas which are naturally inert and supremely subtle. It evolved out of a thousandth part of the Icchāśakti. The final Śakti to evolve, out of a thousandth part of this Ādiśakti, is called the Kṛyāśakti.

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Jnanashakti in Shaivism glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva

Jñānaśakti (ज्ञानशक्ति) refers to one of the Śaktis emanting from a thousandth part of Icchāśakti.—For the benefit of the world Śiva conceives a spontaneous idea, which results in the manifestation of śakti from his one-thousandth part. Then comes Parā-śakti, Ādi-śakti, Icchā-śakti and Kriyā-śakti, each succeeding from the 1/1000 part of the preceeding one. Pratiṣṭhā is another name for Jñānaśakti, whose 1/1000 part forms the Kartṛsādākhya. This is in the form of Divyaliṅga, which resembles the pure crystal in lusture. In the midst of Liṅga there is the form of Īśvara with four heads, four faces, twelve eyes etc.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Jnanashakti in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Jñānaśakti (ज्ञानशक्ति) refers to the “power of knowledge”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “The venerable sacred seat of Jālandhara is in the locus of the cavity (of the mouth). It is adorned with flames of Fire and shines brilliantly and burns with the Doomsday Fire in the form of a (radiant) spark (of light). The venerable Cakrīśanātha is the emperor in the middle of the wheel (located here) and is mounted on the power of his knowledge [i.e., jñānaśakti-ārūḍha] surrounded by many troupes of Yoginīs and is adorned with sixteen energies. (This is the) second sacred seat should be known by means of (the deity’s) energy (to be) within the locus of the cavity shining (there) surrounded by a tree, creeper, guardian, cremation ground, monastery, gesture and cave”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

[«previous next»] — Jnanashakti in Vaishnavism glossary
Source: Prabhupada Books: Sri Caitanya Caritamrta

Jñānaśakti (ज्ञानशक्ति) or simply Jñāna refers to “transcendental knowledge”, according to the Śrī Caitanya Caritāmṛta 2.20.246 (“The Science of the Absolute Truth”).—(Cf. Śaktyāveśa).—The śaktyāveśa-avatāras are categorized into (1) forms of divine absorption (bhagavad-āveśa), such as Kapiladeva or ṛṣabhadeva, and (2) divinely empowered forms (śaktyāveśa), of whom seven are foremost: [i.e., (4) Catuḥsana, or the Kumāras, specifically empowered to distribute transcendental knowledge (jñānaśakti), [...]”.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Jnanashakti in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jñānaśakti (ज्ञानशक्ति):—[=jñāna-śakti] [from jñāna > jñā] f. ‘intellectual faculty’

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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