Jnanadarshana, Jñānadarśana: 5 definitions

Introduction:

Jnanadarshana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Jñānadarśana can be transliterated into English as Jnanadarsana or Jnanadarshana, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Jnanadarshana in Mahayana glossary
Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Jñānadarśana (ज्ञानदर्शन) refers to “one who sees the knowledge (of liberation)”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, “Then the Bodhisattva Gaganagañja, having praised the Lord with these verses, addressed himself to the Lord: ‘[...] Since the Lord has obtained intrepidities, extinguished contamination, was perfectly awakened to sameness (samatā), is skilled in the knowledge of purification without affliction, and roars the best of lions’ roar to all of the world including the gods. Since the Lord is endowed with the eighteen special qualities of the Buddha, he has the unattached knowledge of the three times (trikāla). Since the Lord has purified his body, speech, and mind, he has neither error (skhalita) nor rough speech (ravita), and sees every concentration and the knowledge of liberation (vimukti-jñānadarśana). [...]’”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of jnanadarshana or jnanadarsana in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Jnanadarshana in Jainism glossary
Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Jñānadarśana (ज्ञानदर्शन) refers to “knowledge and perception”, according to Pūjyapāda’s Sarvārthasiddhi.—Accordingly, “[...] But there is nothing in the world which is permanent except the natural characteristics of knowledge and perception  (jñānadarśana) of the self. This is contemplation on the transitory nature of things. He who contemplates thus is free from intense attachment to persons and things, and hence he does not feel stress when he loses them or separates from them as in the case of the garlands used and cast off”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of jnanadarshana or jnanadarsana in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Jnanadarshana in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Jñānadarśana (ज्ञानदर्शन).—name of a Bodhisattva: Kāraṇḍavvūha 1.7.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jñānadarśana (ज्ञानदर्शन):—[=jñāna-darśana] [from jñāna > jñā] n. supreme knowledge, [Buddhist literature; Jaina literature]

2) [v.s. ...] m. Name of a Bodhi-sattva, [Kāraṇḍa-vyūha i, 3.]

[Sanskrit to German]

Jnanadarshana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of jnanadarshana or jnanadarsana in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: