Jhata, Jhaṭa, Jhāṭa: 6 definitions

Introduction

Jhata means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Jhāṭa.—(Ep. Ind., Vol. V, p. 183), a shrub, wood or thicket; Bengali jhād8; a bush; used in sa-jhāṭa-viṭapa (EI 27). Note: jhāṭa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jhaṭa (झट).—n A bore or pest; an encumbrance or embarrassment; a clog;--used freely of persons, occurrences, circumstances. This word will be met with in all the applications given under lacāṇḍa. 2 f A knock or hit (as from striking against); a concussion or sharp stroke v lāga.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

jhaṭa (झट).—n A bore or pest; an encumbrance or embarrassment; a clog. A knock or hit.

--- OR ---

jhaṭa (झट) [-kan-kara-dinī-diśī, -कन्-कर-दिनी-दिशी].—ad Smartly, pro- mptly, in a trice.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jhāṭa (झाट).—[jhaṭ-ṇica-ac]

1) An arbour, bower.

2) A wood, thicket.

3) Cleaning sores.

-ṭā, -ṭī The Jasmine plant.

Derivable forms: jhāṭaḥ (झाटः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jhaṭā (झटा).—f.

(-ṭā) A plant, (Flacourtia cataphracta.) E. jhaṭ to entangled, affix atr.

--- OR ---

Jhāṭa (झाट).—m.

(-ṭaḥ) 1. An arbour, a bower, a place overgrown with creepers. 2. A wood, a thicket. 3. Cleaning sores or wounds. f. (-ṭā-ṭī) 1. Jasmine. 2. A plant, (Flacourtia cataphracta:) see jhāṭa n.

(-ṭaṃ) A wood, a thicket. E. jhaṭ to be entangled, affix ṇic ac . nikuñje kāntāre vraṇādīnāṃ mārjjane bhūmyāmalakyāyāṃ yūthikāyāṃ ca .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jhāṭa (झाट):—m. an arbour, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) a forest (also n., [Horace H. Wilson]), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) cleaning sores, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Jhāṭā (झाटा):—[from jhāṭa] f. = ṭikā, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] a kind of jasmine, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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