Jayasvamin, Jayasvāmin, Jaya-svamin: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Jayasvamin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Jayasvāmin (जयस्वामिन्) is an example of a Vaiṣṇavite name mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions. Classification of personal names according to deities (e.g., from Vaiṣṇavism) were sometimes used by more than one person and somehow seem to have been popular. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. Derivation of personal names (e.g., Jayasvāmin) during the rule of the Guptas followed patterns such as tribes, places, rivers and mountains.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of jayasvamin in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Jayasvamin in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jayasvāmin (जयस्वामिन्).—m. an epithet of Śiva.

Jayasvāmin is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jaya and svāmin (स्वामिन्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jayasvāmin (जयस्वामिन्).—m. the lord of victory, epithet of Śiva, [Rājataraṅgiṇī] 5, 448.

Jayasvāmin is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jaya and svāmin (स्वामिन्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Jayasvāmin (जयस्वामिन्) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—wrote a
—[commentary] on the Hārītasmṛti (?). Hemādri Pariśeṣakhaṇḍa 1, 75.

2) Jayasvāmin (जयस्वामिन्):—son of Harisvāmin: Tāṇḍyabrāhmaṇabhāṣya.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jayasvāmin (जयस्वामिन्):—[=jaya-svāmin] [from jaya] m. ‘victory-lord’, Śiva (?), [iii, 350]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of a scholiast on Chandoga-sūtra and Āśvalāyana-brāhmaṇa, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra x, 7, 2 [Scholiast or Commentator]; Smṛtitattva i]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Jayasvāmin (जयस्वामिन्):—(jaya + svā) m. Herr des Sieges:

1) Beiname Śiva’s [Rājataraṅgiṇī 3, 350. 5, 448.] mipura n. Nomen proprium einer von Juṣka gegründeten Stadt [1, 169.] —

2) Nomen proprium eines Schol. zum Chandogasūtra Schol. zu [Kātyāyana’s Śrautasūtrāṇi 10, 7, 2 (817, 19).]

--- OR ---

Jayasvāmin (जयस्वामिन्):—

1) [?Z. 2 zu Rājataraṅgiṇī 5, 448] vgl. virocana

2) a.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Jayasvāmin (जयस्वामिन्):—m.

1) vielleicht Beiname Śiva's. —

2) Nomen proprium eines Scholiasten.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of jayasvamin in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: