Jayadratha; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jayadratha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Itihasa (narrative history)

Jayadratha in Itihasa glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jayadratha (जयद्रथ) the king of Sindhudeśa married Duśśalā, the youngest sister of Duryodhana. With her, Jayadratha begot many sons. They were all well versed in war tactics. Once, Jayadratha saw Draupadī alone in the hermitage when all her five husbands were absent. Ardently in love with her, Jayadratha tried to abduct her. She was liberated by her five husbands on time.

Source: Archaeological Survey of India: Śaiva monuments at Paṭṭadakal (mahābhārata)

Jayadratha (जयद्रथ) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.108.18) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Jayadratha) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
context information

Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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Purana

Jayadratha in Purana glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jayadratha (जयद्रथ):—Son of Bṛhatkāya (son of Bṛhaddhanu). He had a son who was called Viśada. (see Bhāgavata Purāṇa 9.21.22-23)

Source: Wisdom Library: Bhagavata Purana

1) Jayadratha (जयद्रथ).—A mighty warrior King who ruled over the kingdom of Sindhu. Genealogy. Descended from Viṣṇu in the following order: Brahmā—Atri—Candra—Budha—Purūravas-Āyus—Nahuṣa—Yayāti—Pūru—Janamejaya—Prācinvān—Pravīra—Namasyu—Vītabhaya—Śuṇḍu—Bahuvidha—Saṃyāti—Rahovādi—Raudrāśva—Matināra—Santurodha—Duṣyanta—Bharata—Suhotra—Suhotā—Gala—Gardda—Suketu—Bṛhatkṣatra—Hasti—Ajamīḍha—Bṛhadiṣu—Bṛhaddhanu—Bṛhatkāya—Jayadratha* (See full article at Story of Jayadratha from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

2) Jayadratha (जयद्रथ).—In Mahābhārata, Sabhā Parva, Chapter 8, Stanza 36 we see another Jayadratha who sits in the durbar of yama (the death-god) and meditates upon him.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Jayadratha (जयद्रथ).—The son of Bṛhadkāya and father of Viśada.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 21. 22-23.

1b) The son of Bṛhanmanas and father of Vijaya. His wife was Sambhūti.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 23. 11-12; Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 111; Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 18. 22-23.

1c) The king of Sindhu and an ally of Jarāsandha; was stationed at the north gate of Mathurā, and on the east during the siege of Gomanta; served Duryodhana's army.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 52. 11[6]; 50. 11[7]; 78. [95 (v) 16]; Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 38. 16.

1d) A son of the second Sāvarṇa Manu.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 1. 72.

1e) A son of Bṛhadbhānu.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 48. 101.

1f) A son of Bṛhadiṣu.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 49. 49.

1g) A son of Bṛhadkarman and father of Viśvajit.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 19. 34.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Jayadratha in Hinduism glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

He was married to Dushala, the sister of the Kauravas. When the Pandavas were in exile, he visited their abode when Draupadi was alone, and smitten by her beauty, abducted her. He was captured by Arjuna, who spared his life, so that his cousin should not become a widow.

Source: Apam Napat: Indian Mythology

Jayadratha (जयद्रथ): A warrior on the side of Kauravas who closed the breach effected by Abhimanyu in the Chakravyuha military formation by Dronacharya and trapped him inside.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jayadratha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jayadratha (जयद्रथ).—A king of the Sindhu district and brother-in-law of Duryodhana, having married Duhśalā, daughter of Dhṛtarāṣṭra. [Once while out on hunting, he chanced to see Draupadī in the forest, and asked of her food for himself and his retinue. Draupadī, by virtue of her magical sthālī, was able to supply him with materials sufficient for their break-fast. Jayadratha was so much struck with this act, as well as her personal charms, that he asked her to elope with him. She, of course, indignantly refused, but he succeeded in carrying her off, as her husbands were out on hunting. When they returned they pursued and captured the ravisher and released Draupadī, and he himself was allowed to go after having been subjected to many humiliations. He took a leading part in compassing the death of Abhimanyu, and met his doom at the hands of Arjuna in the great war.]

Derivable forms: jayadrathaḥ (जयद्रथः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of jayadratha in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 56 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Sindhu
Sindhu (सिन्धु) is the name of a river situated in Uttarāpatha (Northern District) of ancient I...
Surya
Sūrya.—(IE 7-1-2; EI 25), ‘twelve’. Note: sūrya is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary...
Visada
Viśada (विशद, “non-slimy”) or Viṣad refers to one of the eight kinds of Vīrya (potency), repres...
Vijaya
1) Vijaya (विजय) is the name of a sacred mountain range in Kaśmīra, according to in the Kathāsa...
Saindhava
Saindhava refers to an ancient district or cultural territory, as mentioned in the 7th-century ...
Bhima
Bhīma (भीम) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as ment...
Anga
Aṅga (अङ्ग) refers to the “major limbs” and represents one of the three types of Āṅgikābhinaya ...
Bhramara
Bhramara (भ्रमर) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as...
Arjuna
Arjuna (अर्जुन) is the name of a tree (Arjuna vṛkṣa) that is associated with the Nakṣatra (cele...
Sukshma
Sūkṣma (सूक्ष्म) or Sūkṣmaśāli refers to one of the ten varieties of “rice” (śāli) according to...
Vriddhakshatra
1) Vṛddhakṣatra (वृद्धक्षत्र).—The father of Jayadratha, the king of Sindhu. (See under Jayadra...
Karna
Karṇa.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘two’. Note: karṇa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it ca...
Dushshala
1) Duśśala (दुश्शल).—One of the hundred sons of Dhṛtarāṣṭra who was killed in war by Bhīma. (Dr...
Brihadratha
1) Bṛhadratha (बृहद्रथ).—A king. He went to the forest to lead a life of retirement after havin...
Shibi
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