Jatiphala, Jātiphala, Jati-phala, Jātīphala: 9 definitions

Introduction

Jatiphala means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous (J) next»] — Jatiphala in Ayurveda glossary
Source: Google Books: Essentials of Ayurveda

Jātīphala (जातीफल).—The Sanskrit name for an important Ayurvedic drug.—The plant grows in other countries from which seeds are obtained for use. The aril of the seeds is known as ‘Jātīpatrī’. Jātīphala is astringent and promotes digestive fire.

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Jātīphala (जातीफल) refers to “nutmeg” (and its shell, viz., jātikośa) and is mentioned in a list of potential causes for indigestion in the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—A complete section in Bhojanakutūhala is devoted for the description of agents that cause indigestion [viz., jātīphala-jātikośa (nutmeg and its shell)]. These agents consumed on a large scale can cause indigestion for certain people. The remedies [viz., kāñjika gruel)] for these types of indigestions are also explained therewith.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Jātīphala (जातीफल) refers to the medicinal plant known as “Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Nutmeg)” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning jātīphala] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Jātiphala (जातिफल) refers to one of the eight trees (vṛkṣa) of the Jñānacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the jñānacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the saṃbhoga-puṭa (‘enjoyment layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. Jātiphala is associated with the charnel ground (śmaśāna) named Ghorayuddha and with the direction-guardian (dikpāla) named Bhūsuta.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous (J) next»] — Jatiphala in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

jātiphala : (nt.) nutmeg.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous (J) next»] — Jatiphala in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jātīphala (जातीफल).—n S A nutmeg.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (J) next»] — Jatiphala in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jātiphala (जातिफल).—(sometimes jātīphalam also) a nutmeg; जातीफलं मातुलानीमहिफेनं च पत्रकम् (jātīphalaṃ mātulānīmahiphenaṃ ca patrakam) Śiva. B.3.15.

Derivable forms: jātiphalam (जातिफलम्).

Jātiphala is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jāti and phala (फल).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jātiphala (जातिफल).—n.

(-laṃ) Nutmeg. E. jāti or jātī mace, and phala fruit; also jātīphala; also jātikoṣa, jāti or jātī and jātipuṣpaṃ.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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