Jataveda, aka: Jātaveda; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jataveda means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

Jātaveda (जातवेद).—Three sons of Purūravas, born from Agni (fire). They are called the Jātavedas. (Bhāgavata, Skandha 9).

(Source): archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Jātaveda (जातवेद).—The Agni born of araṇis, as son to Pūrūravas.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 20. 16-17; IX. 14. 46.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Jātaveda (जातवेद) refers to one of the eight forms of fire (agni) to be assigned to the body parts of the worshipper during preliminary rites before Dīkṣā: an important ritual of Śāktism described in the Śāradātilaka-tantra, chapters III-V. The various tongues (jihvās) of fire are assigned to the various limbs of the body of the worshipper. The eight forms of fire (viz. Jātaveda) are assigned to the body of the worshipper.

(Source): JSTOR: Tāntric Dīkṣā by Surya Kanta
Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

The god of fire. The Jatakas (E.g., J.i.214, 494; iii.17; v.452; vi.201, etc.) contain references to his worship. See Aggi. He is also called Aggideva.

(Source): Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

jātaveda : (m.) fire.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Marathi-English dictionary

jātavēda (जातवेद).—m (Poetry.) Fire. Ex. maga bharathēṃ cētavilā jā0.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jātavēda (जातवेद).—m (Poetry.) Fire.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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