Jalodara, Jala-udara: 11 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Jalodara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Jalodar.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Jalodara (जलोदर) refers to “dropsy” and represents one of the eight types of udararoga (“diseases affecting the belly”) according to the fourth volume of the Rasajalanidhi (chapter 6). Accordingly, “[...] drinking of cold water or anointing the body with oil immediately after drinking of oil, clarified butter or tallow; application of douche of oil; vomiting, purgation, or application of a special douche, called niruha-basti, corrupts the movements of watery fluids in the system leading to the oozing out of water from the affected veins and accumulation of the same in the belly, which becomes glossy, enlarged, and swollen causing a painful sensation around the navel. In this disease [i.e., jalodara], the belly, if tossed, rolls, and shakes with a kind of sound, exactly like a leather bag filled with water”.

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jalōdara (जलोदर).—n (S) Abdominal dropsy, Ascites.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jalodara (जलोदर).—dropsy.

Derivable forms: jalodaram (जलोदरम्).

Jalodara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jala and udara (उदर).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jalodara (जलोदर).—n.

(-raḥ) Dropsy. E. jala, and udara the belly. jalapradhānam udaram .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jalodara (जलोदर).—n. dropsy, Mahābhārata 3, 14664.

Jalodara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jala and udara (उदर).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jalodara (जलोदर).—[neuter] dropsy (water-belly).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jalodara (जलोदर):—[from jala] n. ‘water-belly’, dropsy, [Mahābhārata iii, xii; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhajjātaka xxiii, 3; Bhaktāmara-stotra 41.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jalodara (जलोदर):—[jalo+dara] (raṃ) 1. n. Dropsy.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Jalodara (जलोदर):—(jala + udara) n. Wasserbauch, Wassersucht [Mahābhārata 3, 14664. 12, 11268.] [Varāhamihira’s Bṛhajjātaka 24 (23), 4.] [Weber’s Verzeichniss No. 965.] — Vgl. udara 3.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Jalodara (जलोदर):—n. Wasserbauch , -sucht [Indische studien von Weber 14,375.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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