Jalarakshasa, aka: Jala-rakshasa, Jalarākṣasa; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jalarakshasa means something in Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Jalarākṣasa can be transliterated into English as Jalaraksasa or Jalarakshasa, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Jalarakshasa in Jainism glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jalarākṣasa (जलराक्षस) is the name of a class of rākṣasas according to the Śvetāmbara tradition, while the Digambara does not recognize this class. The rākṣasas refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas). The rākṣasas are black and their caitya-vṛkṣas (sacred-tree) is Kaṇṭaka according to the Digambara They are white and have a fierce appearance according to Śvetāmbara.

The deities such as Jalarākṣasas are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism
General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of jalarakshasa or jalaraksasa in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 934 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Jala
Jala (जल).—mfn. (-laḥ-lā-laṃ) Cold stupid, apathetic, idiotic, &c. n. (-laṃ) 1. Water. 2. A...
Rakshasa
Rākṣasa (राक्षस).—mfn. (-saḥ-sī-saṃ) Infernal, demoniacal. m. (-saḥ) An evil spirit, a demon, a...
Jaladhi
Jaladhi (जलधि).—m. (-dhiḥ) 1. The ocean. 2. A large number, (a hundred lacs of crores.) 3. The ...
Jalada
Jalada (जलद).—mfn. (-daḥ-dā-daṃ) Giving or shedding water. m. (-daḥ) 1. A cloud. 2. A fragrant ...
Jaladhara
Jaladhara (जलधर).—mfn. (-raḥ-rā-raṃ) Holding or having water. m. (-raḥ) 1. A cloud. 2. The ocea...
Jalasaya
Jalaśaya (जलशय).—m. (-yaḥ) Vishnu. E. jala water, and śaya who sleeps; he is supposed to sleep ...
Jalaja
Jalaja (जलज).—mfn. (-jaḥ-jā-jaṃ) Water-born, aquatic. m. (-jaḥ) 1. A fish. 2. Any aquatic anima...
Brahmarakshasa
Brahmarākṣasa (ब्रह्मराक्षस).—a kind of ghost, the ghost of a Brāhmaṇa, who during his life tim...
Jalanidhi
Jalanidhi (जलनिधि).—m. (-dhiḥ) The ocean. E. jala water and nidhi a nest. nidhīyate asmin ni-dh...
Indrajala
1) Indrajāla (इन्द्रजाल) is the name of an Āgama or Tantra mentioned in the Kakṣapuṭatantr...
Jalapraya
Jalaprāya (जलप्राय).—n. (-yaṃ) A country abounding with water. E. jala, and prāya abundance.---...
Jaleshvara
Jaleśvara (जलेश्वर).—m. (-raḥ) 1. A name of the deity of water, Varuna. 2. The ocean. E. jala, ...
Nirjala
Nirjala (निर्जल).—mfn. (-laḥ-lā-laṃ) Dry, desart, void of water. m. (-laḥ) A desart, a waste. E...
Jalayantra
Jala-yantra.—(SII 2, 3), a water-lever. Note: jala-yantra is defined in the “Indian epigraphica...
Jalakrida
Jala-krīḍā.—(ASLV), water sports. Note: jala-krīḍā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical gloss...

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