Jalapada, aka: Jālapāda, Jala-pada; 4 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jalapada means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Jālapāda (जालपाद) is a Sanskrit word referring to the “web-footed bird” (e.g. the cāṣa and the like). The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (also see the Manubhāṣya verse 5.13)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Purana

Jalapada in Purana glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jālapāda (जालपाद).—See under Devadatta I.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Katha (narrative stories)

Jalapada in Katha glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jālapāda (जालपाद) is the name of a great ascetic who, by means of treachery, became a Vidyādhara, as mentioned in the story “Devadatta the gambler”, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 26. Accordingly,  “... there he [Devadatta] saw alone a great ascetic, named Jālapāda, who had attained many objects by magic, and he was muttering spells in a corner”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Jālapāda, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jalapada in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jālapāda (जालपाद).—a goose; जालपादभुजौ तौ तु पादयोश्चक्रलक्षणौ (jālapādabhujau tau tu pādayoścakralakṣaṇau) Mb.12.343.36.

Derivable forms: jālapādaḥ (जालपादः).

Jālapāda is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jāla and pāda (पाद). See also (synonyms): jālapād.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 1757 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Pada
Pāda (पाद, “feet”) refers to one of the seven “major limbs” (aṅga), which represents a division...
Jala
1) Jala (जल).—A deity of water. In Mahābhārata, Sabhā Parva, Chapter 11, Stanza 20 it is mentio...
Padartha
Padārtha (पदार्थ, “categories”).—According to Kaṇāda, all object of knowledge or all real comes...
Janapada
Janapada (जनपद) is a synonym for Deśa (“region”), according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-v...
Ekapada
Ekapāda (एकपाद) or Ekapādamūrti refers to one of the twenty-eighth forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentio...
Padapa
Pādapa (पादप) refers to a “tree”, as mentioned in a list of twenty-five synonyms in the second ...
Drupada
Drupada (द्रुपद).—(Saumaki,* Yajñasena). Father of Pāñcālī. Genealogy. Descended from Viṣṇu i...
Tripada
Tripada.—(LP), the three chief account books, viz. rojmol, khātā-vahī and pāvtī-vahī. Note: tri...
Jalada
Jalada (जलद).—A mountain in Śāka island. The famous country known as Kumudottaravarṣa is near t...
Jaladhi
Jaladhi (जलधि).—The crocodile which is the conveyance of Varuṇa. It is mentioned in Vāmana Purā...
Indrajala
1) Indrajāla (इन्द्रजाल) is the name of an Āgama or Tantra mentioned in the Kakṣapuṭatantr...
Kalmashapada
Kalmāṣapāda (कल्माषपाद).—(KALMĀṢĀṄGHRI, MITRASAHA, SAUDĀSA). A famous king of the Ikṣvāku dynas...
Jaladhara
Jaladhāra (जलधार).—A mountain in Śākadvīpa (The island of Śāka). (Mahābhārata Bhīṣma Parva, Cha...
Dvipada
Dvipada (द्विपद).—a. having two feet (as a verse). Dvipada is a Sanskrit compound consisting of...
Padadi
Padādi (पदादि).—1) the beginning of the line of a stanza. 2) the beginning or first letter of a...

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