Jalam; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jalam means something in the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geogprahy

Jalam is one of the exogamous septs (divisions) among the Madigas (the great leather-working caste of the Telugu country). The Madiga people sometimes call themselves Jambavas, and claim to be descended from Jambu or Adi Jambuvadu, who is perhaps the Jambuvan of the Ramayana.

Source: Project Gutenberg: Castes and Tribes of Southern India, Volume 1
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Relevant definitions

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