Jaladhara, aka: Jala-adhara, Jala-dhara, Jaladhāra, Jalādhāra, Jaladhārā; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jaladhara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

[Jaladhara in Purana glossaries]

Jaladhāra (जलधार).—One of the seven major mountains in Śākadvīpa, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 86. It is also known by the name Candra. Śākadvīpa is one of the seven islands (dvīpa), ruled over by Medhātithi, one of the ten sons of Priyavrata, son of Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Jaladhāra (जलधार).—A mountain in Śākadvīpa (The island of Śāka). (Mahābhārata Bhīṣma Parva, Chapter 11, Stanza 16).

(Source): archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Jaladhāra (जलधार).—A mountain of Śākadvīpa from Vāsava; draws water always from rain.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 19. 85-86; Matsya-purāṇa 122. 9; Vāyu-purāṇa 49. 79.

1b) A continent of Udaya hill.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 122. 20.

2) Jalādhāra (जलाधार).—A mountain of Śākadvīpa; perhaps Jaladhāra (s.v.).*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 4. 62.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of jaladhara in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[Jaladhara in Pali glossaries]

jaladhara : (m.) a rain-cloud. || jalādhāra (jala + adhāra) m. deposit of water; reservoir.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Jaladhara in Sanskrit glossaries]

Jalādhāra (जलाधार).—a pond, lake, reservoir of water.

Derivable forms: jalādhāraḥ (जलाधारः).

Jalādhāra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jala and ādhāra (आधार).

--- OR ---

Jaladhara (जलधर).—

1) a cloud.

2) the ocean.

Derivable forms: jaladharaḥ (जलधरः).

Jaladhara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jala and dhara (धर).

--- OR ---

Jaladhārā (जलधारा).—a stream of water.

Jaladhārā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jala and dhārā (धारा).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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