Jadya, Jaḍyā: 13 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Jadya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Ancient Science of Life: Vaidyavallabha: An Authoritative Work on Ayurveda Therapeutics

Jāḍya (जाड्य) refers to “delayed physical and mental activity” and is dealt with in the 17th-century Vaidyavallabha written by Hastiruci.—The Vaidyavallabha is a work which deals with the treatment and useful for all 8 branches of Ayurveda. The text Vaidyavallabha has been designed based on the need of the period of the author, availability of drugs during that time, disease manifesting [viz., jāḍya] in that era, socio-economical-cultural-familial-spiritual-aspects of that period Vaidyavallabha.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Brhad Bhagavatamrtam

Jāḍya (जाड्य) refers to:—Dullness, inertia. (cf. Glossary page from Śrī Bṛhad-bhāgavatāmṛta).

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jaḍyā (जड्या).—a (jaḍaṇēṃ) A setter of jewels, a jeweler. 2 fig. also jaḍyā bhāū m One who, by arts and wiles, wriggles himself into posts and offices. Ex. hā prācīna tyā gāṃvacā upādhāya navhē jaḍyā āhē.

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jāḍya (जाड्य).—n (S) Gravity or weight. 2 fig. Dullness, stupidity, sluggishness. 3 Coldness, unconcern, apathy. 4 Heaviness or insolubility (as of an article of food). 5 Heaviness of system occasioned by crudities in the stomach.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

jaḍyā (जड्या).—a A jeweller, a setter of jewels.

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jāḍyā (जाड्या).—a Thick, Coarse-cloth. Stout, sturdy-the body. Deep, solid, substantial with sense, learning, talent &c.-a paṇḍita, kavi, kalpanā, kōṭi.

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jāḍya (जाड्य).—n Gravity, weight. Dulness, slug- gishness. Coldness, unconcern, apathy. Heaviness or insolubility (as of an article of food). Heaviness of system occasioned by crudities in the stomach.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jāḍya (जाड्य).—[jaḍasya bhāvaḥ ṣyañ]

1) Coldness, frigidity.

2) Apathy, sluggishness, inactivity.

3) Dulness of intellect, folly, stupidity; तज्जाड्यं वसुधाधिपस्य (tajjāḍyaṃ vasudhādhipasya) Bh.2.15; जाड्यं धियो हरति (jāḍyaṃ dhiyo harati) 2.23; जाड्यं ह्रीमति गण्यते (jāḍyaṃ hrīmati gaṇyate) 54.

4) Tastelessness of the tongue.

Derivable forms: jāḍyam (जाड्यम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jāḍya (जाड्य).—n.

(-ḍyaṃ) 1. Coldness, apathy. 2. Folly, stupidity, dulness or coldness of intellect. 3. Coldness, frigidity. E. jaḍa cold, &c. ṣyañ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jāḍya (जाड्य).—i. e. jaḍa + ya, n. 1. Want of sensation, [Vedāntasāra, (in my Chrestomathy.)] in Chr. 206, 17. 2. Stupidity, [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 2, 20.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jāḍya (जाड्य).—[neuter] coldness, frigidity, stiffness, dulness, stupidity, want of intelligence.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jāḍya (जाड्य):—[from jāḍāyana] n. ([gana] dṛḍhādi) coldness, [Horace H. Wilson]

2) [v.s. ...] chilliness, [Kapila’s Sāṃkhya-pravacana i, 85]

3) [v.s. ...] stiffness, inactivity, insensibility, [Suśruta; Pratāparudrīya; Sāhitya-darpaṇa iii, 156]

4) [v.s. ...] absence of power of taste (in the tongue), [Suśruta iv, 24, 12 and 38, 7]

5) [v.s. ...] dulness, stupidity, [Mahābhārata xii, 6487; Harivaṃśa 15815; Pañcatantra] etc.

6) [v.s. ...] absence of intellect or soul, [Vedāntasāra]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jāḍya (जाड्य):—(ḍyaṃ) 1. n. Coldness, apathy, stupidity, folly.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Jāḍya (जाड्य) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Jaḍḍa, Jala.

[Sanskrit to German]

Jadya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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