Ishvari, Īśvarī: 8 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Ishvari means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Īśvarī can be transliterated into English as Isvari or Ishvari, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

1) Īśvarī (ईश्वरी):—One of the sixty-four Divyauṣadhi, which are powerful drugs for solidifying mercury (rasa), according to Rasaprakāśa-sudhākara (chapter 9).

2) Īśvarī (ईश्वरी):—One of the sixty-eight Rasauṣadhi, very powerful drugs known to be useful in alchemical processes related to mercury (rasa), according to Rasaprakāśa-sudhākara (chapter 9).

3) Īśvarī (ईश्वरी):—One of the sixty-eight Siddhauṣadhi, as per Rasaśāstra texts (rasa literature). These drugs give siddhi (success) in mercurial operations. Even so, they are more powerful than rasa (mercury) itself. These may perform all the kāryas (‘effects’) and grant dehasiddhi (‘perfection of body’) and lohasiddhi (‘transmutation of base metals’) both.

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

Discover the meaning of ishvari or isvari in the context of Rasashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Ṣaṭsāhasra-saṃhitā

Īśvarī (ईश्वरी):—One of the twelve guṇas associated with Piṇḍa, the seventh seat of the Svādhiṣṭhāna-chakra. According to tantric sources such as the Śrīmatottara-tantra and the Gorakṣasaṃhitā (Kādiprakaraṇa), these twelve guṇas are represented as female deities. According to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā however, they are explained as particular syllables. They (e.g. Īśvarī) only seem to play an minor role with regard to the interpretation of the Devīcakra (first of five chakras, as taught in the Kubjikāmata-tantra).

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of ishvari or isvari in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Īśvarī (ईश्वरी, “ruler, mistress”):—Name of one of the sixty-four mātṛs to be worshipped during Āvaraṇapūjā (“Worship of the Circuit of Goddesses”, or “Durgā’s Retinue”), according to the Durgāpūjātattva. They should be worshipped with either the five upācāras or perfume and flowers.

Her mantra is as follows:

ॐ ईश्वर्यै नमः
oṃ īśvaryai namaḥ.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of ishvari or isvari in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Īśvarī (ईश्वरी) is a Sanskrit word referring to the “Indian birthwort”, a species of creep plant from the Aristolochiaceae (Birthwort) family of flowering plants. It is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā. It is also known as Garalikā. The official botanical name is either Aristolochia indica. The Sanskrit word Īśvarī means “queen”. It is derived from Īśvara, which means “able to do” or “capable of”, but in a different context refers to “lord”, “king” or “God”.

This plant is also mentioned as a medicine used for the treatment of all major fevers, as described in the Jvaracikitsā (or “the treatment of fever”) which forms the first chapter of the Sanskrit work called Mādhavacikitsā. In this work, the plant has the synonym Rasona. In this work, the plant is given the name Nākulī.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

1) Īśvarī (ईश्वरी) is another name for Liṅginī, an unidentified medicinal plant, according to verse 3.45-47 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Īśvarī and Liṅginī, there are a total of sixteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

2) Īśvarī (ईश्वरी) is also mentioned as a synonym for Vandhyākarkoṭakī, a medicinal plant identified with Momordica dioica (spiny gourd) from the Cucurbitaceae or “gourd family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.61-63.

3) Īśvarī (ईश्वरी) is also mentioned as a synonym for Rudrajaṭā, a medicinal plant identified with Aristolochia indica (Indian birthwort or duck flower) from the Aristolochiaceae or “birthwort family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.79-81.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of ishvari or isvari in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Īśvarī (ईश्वरी).—A kalā of Viṣṇu.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 35. 95.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of ishvari or isvari in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhajana-rahasya - 2nd Edition

Īśvarī (ईश्वरी) refers to:—Queen, mistress or goddess. (cf. Glossary page from Bhajana-Rahasya).

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

Discover the meaning of ishvari or isvari in the context of Vaishnavism from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

īśvarī (ईश्वरी).—a (S) Relating to īśvara or the Supreme Being, divine. 2 This word, in agreement with the Hebrew idiom, is employed (although not with all amplitude) to express Great, large, much, many, superexcellent, superlative, transcendent &c. See īśvarīānanda, īśvarīnāśa, īśvarī- bala, īśvarīlābha, īśvarīsōhaḷā. This use, which is pure and classical, must not be confounded with that use condemned under īśvara.

--- OR ---

īśvarī (ईश्वरी).—f (S) A general name for the śakti or female energies of the deities, a name for duragā, lakṣmī, sarasvatī &c.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of ishvari or isvari in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: