Ishopanishad, aka: Isha Upanishad, Īśopaniṣad; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Ishopanishad means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Īśopaniṣad can be transliterated into English as Isopanisad or Ishopanishad, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

General definition (in Hinduism)

Ishopanishad in Hinduism glossary... « previous · [I] · next »

The Isha Upanishad (ईशोपनिषद्, 'īśopaniṣad') is one of the shortest of the Upanishads, in form more like a brief poem than a philosophical treatise, consisting of 17 or 18 verses in total. The Upanishad constitutes the final chapter (adhyāya) of the Shukla Yajurveda and survives in two versions, called Kanva (VSK) and Madhyandina (VSM).

Content: The Isha Upanishad is significant for its description of the nature of the "Supreme Being", exhibiting monism or a form of monotheism, referred to as Isha "Lord". It describes this being as "unembodied, omniscient, beyond reproach, without veins, pure and uncontaminated" (verse 8), one who "moves and does not move', who is 'far away, but very near as well'" and who "although fixed in His abode is swifter than the mind" (verses 4 & 5).

The first verse of the text has been cited as of particular importance to Vedanta or to Hinduism as a whole.

The first verse reads:

īśā vāsyam idaṃ sarvaṃ ¦ yat kiñca jagatyāṃ jagat |
tena tyaktena bhuñjīthā ¦ mā gṛdhaḥ kasya sviddhanam ||

literal translation (Ralph T.H. Griffith, 1899):

"Enveloped by the Lord must be This All — each thing that moves on earth.
With that renounced enjoy thyself. Covet no wealth of any man."

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Sri Isopanisad one of the 108 principal Vedic scriptures known as the Upanisads. Sri Isopanisad is a conceptual text, rather than a description of the Lord’s pastimes. Reading and studying this book is meant to advance one’s view of life; to teach one how to re-spiritualize every endeavor of one’s actions.

Source: Bhaktivedanta College: Hinduism

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