Indrajala, aka: Indrajāla, Indra-jala; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Indrajala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[Indrajala in Shaivism glossaries]

Indrajāla (इन्द्रजाल) refers to “creating illusions”. It is a siddhi (‘supernatural power’) described in chapter one of the Kakṣapuṭatantra (a manual of Tantric practice from the tenth century).

(Source): Wisdom Library: Kakṣapuṭa-tantra

1) Indrajāla (इन्द्रजाल) is the name of an Āgama or Tantra mentioned in the Kakṣapuṭatantra  verse 1.5-7.—“At a previous time, when Pārvatī asked him, Śaṅkara told of the attainments of vidyā in the wide worldly life, in various ways. I observed each teaching taught also by the troops of Gods, Siddhas (those who have attained supernatural power), Munis (saints), Deśikas (spiritual teachers), and Sādhakas (tantric practicioners). They are [, for example]: Indrajāla... I shall carefully extract all the above-mentioned āgamas, which are transmitted from mouth to mouth, like butter extracted from coagulated milk”.

2) Indrajāla (इन्द्रजाल) refers to “creating illusions” and represents one of the various siddhis (perfections) mentioned in the Kakṣapuṭatantra verse 1.11-13. Accordingly, “by excellent Sādhakas (tantric practitioners) wishing the Siddhi (eg., indrajāla), the mantrasādhana should be performed in advance, for the sake of the Siddhi. One would not attain any Siddhi without the means of mantra-vidhāna (the classification of mantra)”.

(Source): Shodhganga: Mantra-sādhana: Chapter One of the Kakṣapuṭatantra
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana

[Indrajala in Purana glossaries]

Indrajāla (इन्द्रजाल).—One of the upayās of a king.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 222. 2.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[Indrajala in Marathi glossaries]

indrajāla (इंद्रजाल).—n (S) Jugglery, legerdemain, conjuring.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

indrajāla (इंद्रजाल) [-ḷa, -ळ].—n Jugglery, legerdemain, conjuring.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Indrajala in Sanskrit glossaries]

Indrajāla (इन्द्रजाल).—[indrasya parameśvarasya jālaṃ māyeva]

1) the net of Indra. तेनाह- मिन्द्रजालेनामूंस्तमसाभि दधामि सर्वान् (tenāha- mindrajālenāmūṃstamasābhi dadhāmi sarvān) Av.8.8.8.

2) a weapon used by Arjuna; a stratagem or trick in war.

3) deception, cheating.

4) conjuring, jugglery, magical tricks; इन्द्रजालं च मायां वै कुहका वाऽपि भीषणा (indrajālaṃ ca māyāṃ vai kuhakā vā'pi bhīṣaṇā) Mb.5.16.55. स्वप्नेन्द्रजालसदृशः खलु जीवलोकः (svapnendrajālasadṛśaḥ khalu jīvalokaḥ) Śānti.2.2; K.15.

Derivable forms: indrajālam (इन्द्रजालम्).

Indrajāla is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms indra and jāla (जाल).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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