Hutashani, Hutāśanī, Huta-ashani: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Hutashani means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Hutāśanī can be transliterated into English as Hutasani or Hutashani, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Hutashani in Shaivism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Hutāśanī (हुताशनी):—One of the nine Dūtī presided over by one of the nine bhaivaravas named Diṅmaheśvara (emanation of Ananta, who is the central presiding deity of Dūtīcakra), according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra and the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Sanskrit Edition and a Translation of Kambala’s Sādhananidhi, Chapter 8

Hutāśanī (हुताशनी) is the name of a Deity associated with the syllable “hūṃ” of the Devīhṛdayamantra (Goddess’ heart mantra): one of the four major mantras in the Cakrasaṃvara tradition, as taught in the eighth chapter of the 9th-century Herukābhidhāna and its commentary, the Sādhananidhi. The thirteen letters constituting the mantra are transformed in meditation into thirteen deities. All these female deities [viz., Hutāśanī] have their male consorts who resemble their consort female deities in appearance and are in sexual union with them.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Hutashani in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

hutāśanī (हुताशनी).—f (hutāśana S) The pile arranged to be kindled at the festival of hōḷī.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

hutāśanī (हुताशनी).—f The pile arranged to be kindled at the festival of Holi.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Hutashani in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Hutāśanī (हुताशनी).—the full-moon day in the month of Phālguna (holikā).

Hutāśanī is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms huta and aśanī (अशनी).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Hutāsanī (हुतासनी).—(read °śanī), name of a rākṣasī: Mahā-Māyūrī 243.13.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hutāśanī (हुताशनी).—f. (-nī) The full-moon-day in the month of Falguna: holākā .

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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