Homacarya, Homācārya, Homa-acarya: 1 definition

Introduction

Homacarya means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Homacharya.

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: De Gruyter: A Fragment of the Vajrāmṛtamahātantra

Homācārya (होमाचार्य) or Maṇḍalācārya refers to the master who celebrates the homa liturgy, as defined in the ‘homa-vidhi’ chapter of the 9th-century Vajrāmṛtatantra or Vajrāmṛtamahātantra: one of the main and earliest Buddhist Yoginītantras. The maṇḍalācārya (i.e. the homācārya, the master who celebrates the homa liturgy) should first identify himself with Vajrasattva; adorned with all embellishments and in the ālīḍha posture, he should then perform the Victory of the Three Worlds (trailokyavijaya) (i.e. he should identify himself with the Krodharāja deity) and eventually cleanse the ground (bhūmisaṃśodhana): the practitioner should drive away the obstacles (vighnotsāraṇa), pay homage to the Guru, and attract the Deity of the Earth (pṛthivīdevatā).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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