Hiri, Hirī: 8 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Hiri means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A Yakkha chieftain to be invoked in time of need by followers of the Buddha. D.iii.205; DA.iii.970.

Source: Journey to Nibbana: Patthana Dhama

Part of the Sobhana Cetasikas. Hiri hinders citta not to do bad things as doing so probably will face with disgraceful situations. In the presence of hiri, as it reminds to consider the consequences of the actions, citta will not do bad things due to this inhibition. It always arises with its friend ottappa cetasika as a companion.

Together with ottappa, these two cetasikas guard the world in the favourable social conditions. Men and women are attracted to each other and this finally leads to sex. But hiri and ottappa hinder unnecessary events. These two cetasikas are called lokapala dhamma. They work not only in avoiding sex matter in inappropriate relationship but also in avoiding all akusala dhamma.

Source: Dhamma Study: Cetasikas

conscience;

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

hiri : (f.) shyness; sense of shame.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Hiri, & hirī (f.) (cp. Vedic hrī) sense of shame, bashfulness, shyness S.I, 33; D.III, 212; A.I, 51, 95; III, 4 sq., 331, 352; IV, 11, 29; Sn.77, 253, 719; Pug.71; Pv IV.73; J.I, 129, 207; Nett 50, 82; Vism.8. explained Pug.23 sq.; is one of the cāga-dhana’s: see cāga (cp. Jtm 311).—Often contrasted to & combined with ottappa (cp. below) fear of sin: A.I, 51; D.III, 284; S.II, 206; It.36; Nett 39; their difference is explained at Vism.464 (“kāya-duccarit’ādīhi hiriyatī ti hiri; lajjāy’etaṃ adhivacanaṃ; tehi yeva ottappatī ti ottappaṃ; pāpato ubbegass’etaṃ adhivacanaṃ”); J.I, 129 sq.; DhsA.124.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Hiri (हिरि).—(= Pali id.), name of a yaksa leader: Mahā-Māyūrī 235.25.

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Hirī (हिरी).—see Hrī.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hiri (हिरि).—(°—) = hari.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hiri (हिरि):—mfn. (= hari, ‘yellow, golden’) in the following words:

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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