Hiranyagarbha, Hiraṇyagarbha, Hiranya-garbha: 14 definitions

Introduction

Hiranyagarbha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (H) next»] — Hiranyagarbha in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Hiraṇyagarbha (हिरण्यगर्भ).—A synonym of Śrī Kṛṣṇa. (Śānti Parva, Chapter 342, Verse 96).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Hiraṇyagarbha (हिरण्यगर्भ).—Is Brahmā.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 1. 35; 65. 23.

1b) Is Vāsudeva;1 as the author of Yogaśāstra.2

  • 1) Viṣṇu-purāṇa VI. 7. 56.
  • 2) Ib. II. 13. 44.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous (H) next»] — Hiranyagarbha in Shaivism glossary
Source: Manblunder: Sri Rudram 2.1-2

Hiraṇyagarbha (हिरण्यगर्भ):—The souls originated from the hiraṇyagarbha or the golden egg. This is so called, as it is born from a golden egg, formed out of the seed deposited in the waters when they were produced as the first creation of the Self-existent This seed became a golden egg, resplendent as the sun, in which the Self-existent Brahma was born as Brahmā the Creator, who is therefore regarded as a manifestation of the Self-existent.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

[«previous (H) next»] — Hiranyagarbha in Pancaratra glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva (pancaratra)

Hiraṇyagarbha (हिरण्यगर्भ) or Hiraṇyagarbhasaṃhitā is the name of a Vaiṣṇava Āgama scripture, classified as a sāttvika type of the Muniprokta group of Pāñcarātra Āgamas. The vaiṣṇavāgamas represent one of the three classes of āgamas (traditionally communicated wisdom).—Texts of the Pāñcara Āgamas are divided in to two sects. It is believed that Lord Vāsudeva revealed the first group of texts which are called Divya and the next group is called Muniprokta which are further divided in to three viz. a. Sāttvika (eg., Hiraṇyagarbha-saṃhitā). b. Rājasa. c. Tāmasa.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

[«previous (H) next»] — Hiranyagarbha in Hinduism glossary
Source: Google Books: Tattvabodha

All the souls put together is the Brahman. In the same way, all the subtle bodies put together, is known as hiraṇyagarbha or the cosmic egg. Hiraṇyagarbha is endowed with intellect and this intellect, also known as mahat, is the cause for the physical body. Hiraṇyagarbha can be considered as the feminine energy, if soul is considered as the masculine energy. Unless, the soul impregnates hiraṇyagarbha, creation is not possible.

Source: humindian: 108 names of Lord Krishna

One of the 108 names of Krishna; Meaning: "The All Powerful Creator"

India history and geogprahy

[«previous (H) next»] — Hiranyagarbha in India history glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Hiraṇyagarbha.—(EI 16; IA 10; SII 3), name of a mahādāna. Note: hiraṇyagarbha is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (H) next»] — Hiranyagarbha in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Hiraṇyagarbha (हिरण्यगर्भ).—

1) Name of Brahman (as born from a golden-egg).

2) Name of Viṣṇu.

3) the soul invested by the subtile body or सूक्ष्मशरीर (sūkṣmaśarīra) q. v.

Derivable forms: hiraṇyagarbhaḥ (हिरण्यगर्भः).

Hiraṇyagarbha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms hiraṇya and garbha (गर्भ).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Hiraṇyagarbha (हिरण्यगर्भ).—n. of a king: Mmk 622.7.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hiraṇyagarbha (हिरण्यगर्भ).—m.

(-rbhaḥ) 1. Brahma. 2. Vishnu. 3. The soul invested by the subtile body, “sūkṣmaśarīra”. E. hiraṇya gold, garbha embryo; or the mundane egg floating on the water at creation, of that metal, or of similar colour, from which the deity issued, according to some legends.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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