Hira, Hīra, Hīrā: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Hira means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Heer.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Hīra (हीर) is an onomatopoeic word (another name) for the Lion (Siṃha), according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

hīra : (nt.) a splinter; a stripe.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Hīra, (cp. late Sk. hīra) 1. a necklace (?) VvA.176.—2. a small piece, splinter J.IV, 30 (sakalika°); hīrahīraṃ karoti to cut to pieces, to chop up J.I, 9; DhA.I, 224 (+khaṇḍâkhaṇḍaṃ). (Page 732)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

hirā (हिरा).—m (hīraka or hīra S) A diamond. Pr. hirā tō hirā gāra tī gāra The flint must ever remain at unapproachable distance from the diamond.

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hīra (हीर).—m A rib of the leaf (of trees of the Palmtribe). 2 A fibre of kinds of wood (as of that of the māḍa, tāḍa, suramāḍa, pōphaḷa, vēḷū); a line running along wood generally. 3 fig. Hardness remaining in badly boiled rice &c. 4 A fine splint or splinter (of fibre, reed, stubble, wood &c.) with or without reference to its running into the flesh. v bhara, śira, sala, upaṭa. hīra bhājaṇēṃ g. of o. (To singe the fine point of a fibre or splinter; or to scorch the fine shootings or eyes of sowing corn;--making both dull or dead and impotent.) To take the conceit out of; to destroy the shine and bravery of: also to undergo such treatment.

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hīra (हीर).—f (īrṣyā S) Emulation or coping with. Note. Although hīramōḍa & hīrasāṇḍa compounds of hīra are sufficiently common, hīra is uncommon, and is viewed but as a misspelling of īra q. v.

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hīra (हीर) [or हीरक, hīraka].—m S A diamond.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

hirā (हिरा).—m A diamond.

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hīra (हीर).—m A rib of the leaf (of trees of the palm-tribe). hīra bhājaṇēṃ To take the conceit out of; to destroy the shine of; also to undergo such treatment. A kind of wood-fibre.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Hīra (हीर).—[hṛ-ka ni]

1) A snake.

2) A necklace.

3) A lion.

4) Name of the father of Srīharṣa, the author of the Naishadha-charita.

5) Name of Śiva.

-raḥ, -ram The thunderbolt of Indra.

2) A diamond; (occurring in the concluding stanza of each canto of naiṣadhacarita).

Derivable forms: hīraḥ (हीरः).

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Hīrā (हीरा).—

1) An epithet of Lakṣmī.

2) An ant.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Hirā (हिरा).—sand, see hirodaka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hīra (हीर).—m.

(-raḥ) 1. Siva. 2. A snake. 3. A necklace. 4. A lion. 5. Name of the father of Sriharsha, the author of Naishadha-Kavyam. n.

(-raṃ) 1. A diamond. 2. Indra'S thundorbolt. f.

(-rā) 1. The goddess Lakshmi. 2. A cockroach. 3. An ant. E. hṛ to take, ka aff., and īru substituted for the radical finals.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hīra (हीर).— (partly for hāra, q. cf.), I. m. 1. Indra's thunderbolt. 2. A necklace. 3. A lion. 4. A snake. 5. Śiva. Ii. f. . 1. Lakṣmī. 2. An ant. 3. A cockroach. Iii. n. A diamond.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hira (हिर).—[masculine] band, stripe.

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Hīra (हीर).—[substantive] diamond.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Hīra (हीर) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—father of Harsha (Naiṣadhīyacarita).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Hira (हिर):—m. a band, strip, fillet, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa] (= mekhalā [Scholiast or Commentator])

2) Hirā (हिरा):—[from hira] a f. See next.

3) [v.s. ...] b f. a vein, artery (cf. hitā ami sirā), [Atharva-veda; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā]; Gmelina Arborea, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] cf. [according to] to some, [Latin] haru (-spex) .

5) Hīra (हीर):—m. a diamond, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) a thunderbolt, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) a serpent, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) a lion, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) a string of pearls (connected with 1. hāra), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) Name of Śiva, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) of the father of Harṣa, [Vāsavadattā, [Introduction]]

12) Hīrā (हीरा):—[from hīra] f. a kind of ant or moth, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] Gmelina Arborei, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] Name of Lakṣmī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

15) [v.s. ...] of a woman, [Catalogue(s)]

16) Hīra (हीर):—mn. a diamond, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

17) a kind of metre, [Colebrooke]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hīra (हीर):—(raḥ) 1. m. Shiva; Indra's thunderbolt; a snake; necklace; lion. 1. f. Lakshmī; cockroach; ant. n. Diamond.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Hīra (हीर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Hīra.

[Sanskrit to German]

Hira in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Hīra (हीर) [Also spelled heer]:—(nm) pith, essence, quintessence; see [hīrā].

2) Hīrā (हीरा):—(nm) a diamond; —[ādamī] a good egg, a gem amongst men; —[cāṭanā, hīre kī kamī cāṭanā] to commit suicide (by licking a diamond or diamond particle).

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Hīra (हीर) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Hīra.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Hira (ಹಿರ):—[verb] the plant Drypetes sepiaria ( = Hemicyclia sepiaria) of Euphorbiaceae family.

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Hīra (ಹೀರ):—

1) [noun] a transparent, flawless or almost flawless piece of a pure or nearly pure, extremely hard form of carbon, naturally crystallised in the isometric system, valued as a precious gem; diamond.

2) [noun] a loud, explosive, resounding noise produced by the explosive expansion of air heated by a lightning discharge; thunder.

3) [noun] a snake.

4) [noun] a necklace.

5) [noun] a tiger.

6) [noun] Śiva.

7) [noun] the plant Drypetes sepiaria ( = Hemicyclia sepiaria) of Euphorbiaceae family.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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