Hindu iconography; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Hindu iconography means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Hindu iconography in Shilpashastra glossary... « previous · [H] · next »

Hindu iconography.—The study of iconography is almost entirely conditioned by a study of religion. This fact is particularly true of India, where image worship takes an important place in the popular religious worship of the country. The objects worshipped by Hindus in the temples are images of gods and goddesses, śālagrāmās, bāna-liṅgas, certain animals, birds, powers, and energies.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)
Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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