Hikka, Hikkā: 19 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Hikka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Hikkā (हिक्का, “hiccup”) represents the fourth stage of the action of poison (viṣa) after drinking it, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 26. In a dramatic play, the representation of death from drinking poison is displayed by throwing out of hands and feet and other limbs. The power of the poison will lead to the quivering action of the different parts of the body.

Hikkā according to the Nāṭyaśāstra: “hiccup (hikkā) should be represented by repeated blinking of eyes, belching, vomiting, convulsion (ākṣepa), and uttering of indistinct words”.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Research Gate: Internal applications of Vatsanabha (Aconitum ferox wall)

Hikkā (हिक्का) refers to “hiccup”. Vatsanābha (Aconitum ferox), although categorized as sthāvara-viṣa (vegetable poisons), has been extensively used in ayurvedic pharmacopoeia.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Hikkā (हिक्का) refers to “hiccough” and is one of the various diseases mentioned in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning hikkā] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Hikkā (हिक्का):—Hiccough

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Hikkā (हिक्का) (lit. “one who make a spasmodie sound in the throat”) is a synonym (another name) for the [Female] Owl (Ulūka), according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Hikkā (हिक्का) or Hikkāroga refers to “hiccough” according to the fifth volume of the Rasajalanidhi (chapter 4).

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

hikkā : (f.) hiccup.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Hikkā, (f.) (cp. Epic Sk. hikkā, fr. hikk to sob; onomat.) hiccup Sdhp.279. (Page 731)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

hikkā (हिक्का).—f (S) Hiccough,--a single convulsion under that affection. 2 m Better hēkā.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Hikkā (हिक्का).—

1) An indistinct sound.

2) Hiccough; शुकानामपि सर्वेषां हिक्किका प्रोच्यते ज्वरः (śukānāmapi sarveṣāṃ hikkikā procyate jvaraḥ) Mb.12.283. 55.

3) (hikkā) An owl.

See also (synonyms): hikkikā, hikkita.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hikkā (हिक्का).—f.

(-kkā) 1. Hiccough. 2. An indistinct sound. E. hikk to hiccough, affs. aṅ and ṭāp .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hikkā (हिक्का).—f. Hiccough, [Lassen, Anthologia Sanskritica.] 17, 4; [Rāmāyaṇa] 6, 28, 26.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hikkā (हिक्का).—[feminine] hikkita [neuter] sobbing.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Hikkā (हिक्का):—[from hikk] f. hiccup (cf, hekkā), sob, a spasmodic sound in the throat, [Suśruta; Rāmāyaṇa; Harivaṃśa]

2) [v.s. ...] an owl, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hikkā (हिक्का):—(kkā) 1. f. Hiccough.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Hikkā (हिक्का) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Hikkā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Hikka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Hikkā (हिक्का) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Hikkā.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Hikka (ಹಿಕ್ಕ):—[noun] a quick, involuntary inhalation that follows a spasm of the diaphragm and is suddenly checked by closure of the glottis, producing a short, relatively sharp sound; hiccup.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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