Hema, Hemā: 20 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Hema means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: archive.org: Illustrations of Indian Music and Dance in Western Indian Style

Hemā (हेमा) refers to a type of mūrchanā (melodic mode), and its illustration as a Goddess (according to 15th-century Indian art) is as follows.—The colour of her body is golden. She holds a conch with both hands. She wears a bodice of dark-rosy colour and a scarf of light-green colour with red dots and white design. Her trouser is og yellow colour with a black design and a golden border.

The illustrations (of, for example Hemā) are found scattered throughout ancient Jain manuscripts from Gujarat. The descriptions of these illustrations of this citrāvalī are based on the ślokas of Vācanācārya Gaṇi Sudhākalaśa’s Saṅgītopaniṣatsāroddhāra (14th century) and Śārṅgadeva’s Saṅgītaratnākara (13th century).

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Hema (हेम) refers to “Gold”, representing the material for Kubera’s liṅga according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.12, where the Devas and Viṣṇu requested Viśvakarman for liṅgas for the achievement of the desires of all people:—“[...] at our bidding Viśvakarmā made liṅgas and gave them to the devas according to their status. [...] Indra took a liṅga made of Ruby. The son of Viśravas (Naiśravaṇa or Kubera) took a liṅga of gold (Hema-linga). [...] Thus different kinds of liṅgas were given to them by Viśvakarmā which the devas and the celestial sages worship regularly. After giving the devas the various liṅgas from a desire for their benefit, Viṣṇu explained the mode of worship of Śiva to me, Brahmā”.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Hemā (हेमा).—A lover (wife) of Maya, the asura. (For details see Maya, Indra, Para 61 and sub para 3 of Para, 24, Rāma and Svayamprabhā.).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Hema (हेम).—A son of Ruśadratha (Uśadratha, Vāyu-purāṇa) and father of Sutapas.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 23. 4; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 74. 25; Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 25; Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 18. 12.

2) Hemā (हेमा).—An Apsaras; daughter of Yama, of golden mien and excellent eyes.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 7, 61.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Hemā (हेमा) is another name for Svarṇajīvantī, a plant similar to Jīvantī, a medicinal plant identified with Leptadenia reticulata (cork swallow-wort) from the Apocynaceae, or “dogbane family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.42-44 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Hemā and Svarṇajīvantī, there are a total of fourteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Google Books: Himalayan Glaciers

Sanskrit translation of the word snow and ice is ‘Hema’. The snow covered Himalayas were called the ‘Haemvant’. In most parts of the Himalayas even local dialects do not hae a word to denote glaciers, though they have local names for important glaciers.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A class of elephants having the strength of one hundred million men. UdA.403; AA.ii.832; BuA.37, etc.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Sanskrit Edition and a Translation of Kambala’s Sādhananidhi, Chapter 8

Hemā (हेमा) is the name of a deity associated with the syllable “he” of the Heart Mantra of Heruka (hṛdayamantra): one of the four major mantras in the Cakrasaṃvara tradition, as taught in the eighth chapter of the 9th-century Herukābhidhāna and its commentary, the Sādhananidhi.  The Hṛdaya-mantra consists of twenty-two letters. [...] A practitioner in meditation visualizes that twenty-two deities [viz., Hemā] are developed from the twenty-two letters constituting the mantra. Each letter of the mantra is used as the initial letter of each deity’s name except for the first and second deities, who are the chief couple deities and located at the center of the maṇḍala.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Hemā (हेमा) is the name of an Apsaras, instructed by Śakra to help in the preparations of Ṛṣabha’s wedding-preparations, according to chapter 1.2 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly,

“[...] Then having ascertained the Lord’s purpose, Purandara at once summoned gods for the tasks of the wedding-preparations.—‘[...] Why are you playing elsewhere, Rāmā? Hemā, why do you look at gold? Kratusthalā, why are you confused, as if drunk?  [...]’. From the bustling of the Apsarases instructing each other in this way, and frequently calling names, a mighty tumult arose”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Hema.—(IE 8-1), abbreviation of hemanta. See also hema- dhānyaka. Note: hema is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Hema.—same as māṣa; cf. hema-dhānyaka. Note: hema is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

hema : (nt.) gold.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Hema, (nt.) (cp. Epic Sk. heman) gold D.II, 187; J.VI, 574.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

hēma (हेम).—n S Gold.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

hēma (हेम).—n Gold.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Hema (हेम).—[hi-man]

1) Gold.

2) The thorn-apple.

-maḥ 1 A dark or brown-coloured horse.

2) A particular weight of gold.

3) The planet Mercury.

-mā 1 The earth.

2) A handsome woman.

Derivable forms: hemam (हेमम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hema (हेम).—m.

(-maḥ) 1. A horse of a dark colour. 2. The planet Mercury. 3. A weight of gold, equal to a Masha. n.

(-maṃ) 1. Gold. 2. The Nagakeśara flower. 3. The Dhattura. f.

(-mā) 1. An Apsarasas or courtezan of heaven. 2. A handsome woman. E. hi to go, man aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Hema (हेम).—I. m. A horse of dark colour. Ii. n. Gold (cf. heman).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Hema (हेम):—[from heman] 1. hema in [compound] for 3. heman.

2) [from heman] 2. hema m. a [particular] weight of gold (= māṣaka), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] a horse of a dark or brownish colour, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] Name of Buddha, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] of a son of Ruśad-ratha, [Purāṇa]

6) [v.s. ...] of the father of Su-tapas, [ib.]

7) [v.s. ...] = hema-candra, [Catalogue(s)]

8) Hemā (हेमा):—[from hema > heman] f. Hoya Viridiflora, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] the earth, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] a handsome woman, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] Name of an Apsaras, [Harivaṃśa; Rāmāyaṇa]

12) [v.s. ...] of a river, [Mahābhārata]

13) Hema (हेम):—[from heman] n. gold, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Hema (हेम):—

1) m. a) ein best. Gewicht (Goldwerth), = māṣaka [VAIDYAKAPARIBHĀṢĀ im Śabdakalpadruma]; vgl. hemadhānyaka . — b) ein dunkelfarbiges Pferd [Halāyudha 2, 282.] [ŚABDĀRTHAK.] bei [WILSON.] — c) ein N. Budha's [Śabdakalpadruma] ohne Angabe einer best. Aut.; vgl. hemna . — d) Nomen proprium eines Sohnes des Ruśadratha [Viṣṇupurāṇa 444.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 9, 23, 4.] = hemacandra [Oxforder Handschriften 352,a,20.] —

2) f. ā a) eine best. Pflanze, = svarṇajīvantikā [RĀJAṆ. 3, 30.] — b) ein schönes Weib [ŚABDĀRTHAK.] bei [WILSON.] — c) Nomen proprium κ) einer Apsaras ebend. [VYĀḌI] beim Schol. zu [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 183.] [Harivaṃśa 7226. 8452.] [Rāmāyaṇa 2, 91, 17. 4, 51, 15. fgg. 7, 12, 6. fgg.] — β) eines Flusses [Mahābhārata 6, 331] [?(Viṣṇupurāṇa 183).] —

3) n. = heman Gold [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 1043,] [Scholiast] [ŚABDĀRTHAK.] bei [WILSON.] — Vgl. bhartṛ und 2. haima .

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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