Havis, aka: Haviṣ, Havish; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Havis means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Haviṣ can be transliterated into English as Havis or Havish, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Havis (हविस्) refers to the “oblation” to be offered for gods, as described in verse 25.87b-89a of the Īśvarasaṃhitā. Accordingly, “the oblation (havis) (to be offered) for gods is stated to be made free from (small) pieces of stones, chaff, small particles, prepared out of rice grains that are unbaked, coated or soaked in cow’s milk, and ghee, mixed up with fruits and pieces of jaggery and not having artificial salt”. Also, in verse 90b-91a, “the best oblation is to be prepared when śāntika and vratayajña are done, with artificial salt mixed up with jaggery, milk and fruits”.

There are eight kinds of oblations (havis) mentioned:

  1. Pāyasānna,
  2. Guḍānna,
  3. Mudgānna,
  4. Kevalodana,
  5. Dadhyanna,
  6. Tilānna.
Source: archive.org: Isvara Samhita Vol 5
Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Havis (हविस्) is a Sanskrit word referring to “sacrificial cake” and such things. The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (also see the Manubhāṣya verse 5.7)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Havis (हविस्) is the general term for an offering to the gods, ‘oblation’, whether of grain, or Soma, or milk, or clarified butter, etc. It is common from the Rigveda onwards.

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Havis (हविस्) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Havis] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Havis (हविस्).—n. [hūyate hu-karmaṇi asun]

1) An oblation or burnt offering in general; वहति विधिहुतं या हविः (vahati vidhihutaṃ yā haviḥ) Ś.1.1; Ms. 3.87,132;5.7;6.12.

2) Clarified butter; न जातु कामः कामानामुपभोगेन शाम्यति । हविषा कृष्णवर्त्मेव भूय एवाभिवर्धते (na jātu kāmaḥ kāmānāmupabhogena śāmyati | haviṣā kṛṣṇavartmeva bhūya evābhivardhate) Bhāg.9.19.14.

3) Water.

4) Name of Śiva.

5) A sacrifice; स्यादन्यायत्वादिज्यागामी हविःशब्दः (syādanyāyatvādijyāgāmī haviḥśabdaḥ) MS.6.4.21; यदीमानि हवींषीह विमथिष्यन्त्यसाधवः (yadīmāni havīṃṣīha vimathiṣyantyasādhavaḥ) Mb.12.8.1.

6) Food (anna); ब्राह्मणेभ्यो हविर्दत्वा मुच्येत तेन पात्मना (brāhmaṇebhyo havirdatvā mucyeta tena pātmanā) Mb.13.136.16.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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