Harisvamin, aka: Harisvāmin, Hari-svamin; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Harisvamin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Katha (narrative stories)

Harisvamin in Katha glossary... « previous · [H] · next »

1) Harisvāmin (हरिस्वामिन्) is the name of a Brāhman from Ujjayinī, as mentioned in the fifth story of the Vetālapañcaviṃśati in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 79. Accordingly, “... in Ujjayinī there lived an excellent Brāhman, the dear dependent and minister of King Puṇyasena, and his name was Harisvāmin. That householder had by his wife, who was his equal in birth, an excellent son like himself, Devasvāmin by name. And he also had born to him a daughter, famed for her matchless beauty, rightly named Somaprabhā”.

2) Harisvāmin (हरिस्वामिन्) is the son of Devasvāmin: a Brāhman from from Vārāṇasī, as mentioned in the thirteenth story of the Vetālapañcaviṃśati in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 87. Accordingly, “... and that rich Brāhman [Devasvāmin] had a son named Harisvāmin; and he had an exceedingly lovely wife, named Lāvaṇyavatī... Now, one night Harisvāmin fell asleep, as he was reposing with her in a palace cool with the rays of the moon”.

The story of Harisvāmin is mentioned in the Vetālapañcaviṃśati (twenty-five tales of a vetāla) which is embedded in the twelfth book of the Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’). The main book is a famous Sanskrit epic detailing the exploits of prince Naravāhanadatta in his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The Kathā-sarit-sāgara is is explained to be an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā which consisted of 100,000 verses and in turn forms part of an even larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
context information

Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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