Hamsavati, Haṃsavatī, Hamsavatī: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Hamsavati means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Hamsavati in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Haṃsavatī (हंसवती) is the name of a river mentioned in a list of rivers, flowing from the five great mountains (Śailavarṇa, Mālākhya, Korajaska, Triparṇa and Nīla), according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 82. Those who drink the waters of these rivers live for ten thousand years and become devotees of Rudra and Umā.

One of the five mountains situated near Bhadrāśva, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 82. The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, a type of Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, instructions for religious ceremonies and a whole range of topics concerning the various arts and sciences. The original text is said to have been composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of hamsavati in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

Hamsavati 1. The City of birth of Padumuttara Buddha (J.i.37; Bu.xi.19, etc.). It existed in the time of Tissa Buddha also, for he preached to Brahmadeva and Udayana of Hamsavati (BuA.189).

The river Bhagirathi flowed by the city. Ap.ii.343.

Hamsavati 2. The Pali name for the city of Pegu in Burma. Bode, op. cit., 36.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

Discover the meaning of hamsavati in the context of Theravada from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geography

Source: Ancient Buddhist Texts: Geography of Early Buddhism

Haṃsāvatī (हंसावती) is the name of a locality as recorded in the Pāli Buddhist texts (detailing the geography of ancient India as it was known in to Early Buddhism).—Some of the Therīs whose verses are preserved in the Therīgāthā were born in the city of Haṃsāvatī. The names of those Therīs are: Dhammadinnā, Ubbiriyā and Selā. It is dificult to identify Haṃsāvatī with any known locality in India though it is generally known that there was a place somewhere in India. There was also a city of this name in Lower Burma, and the city is said to be identical with Pegu.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of hamsavati in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Hamsavati in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Haṃsavatī (हंसवती).—f. (-tī) A creeper, (Cissus pedata.) E. haṃsa a goose, (its foot,) and matup aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Haṃsavatī (हंसवती):—[=haṃsa-vatī] [from haṃsa-vat > haṃsa] f. a verse containing the word haṃsa (applied to, [Ṛg-veda iv, 40, 5], in which the sun in the form of Dadhi-krā, here called Haṃsa, is identified with Para-brahman or the Supreme Being; this verse is also found in [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā x, 24; xii, 14 etc.]), [Āpastamba-śrauta-sūtra]

2) [v.s. ...] Cissus Pedata, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of the first wife of Duṣyanta ([varia lectio] for -padikā), [Śakuntalā]

4) [v.s. ...] of the murderess of Vīra-sena, [Harṣacarita]

5) [v.s. ...] of a town and district (= Pegu), [Buddhist literature]

6) Haṃsāvatī (हंसावती):—[from haṃsa] f. Name of a woman, [Daśakumāra-carita]

7) [v.s. ...] of Pegu, [Inscriptions]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Haṃsavatī (हंसवती):—(tī) 3. f. A creeper, Cissus pedata.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Haṃsāvatī (हंसावती):—f. Nomen proprium eines Frauenzimmers [Daśakumāracarita 118, 4.] — Vgl. haṃsavatī .

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of hamsavati in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: