Gulika, Guḷikā, Guḷika, Gulikā: 23 definitions

Introduction:

Gulika means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Guḷikā and Guḷika can be transliterated into English as Gulika or Guliika, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Gulika (गुलिक).—A hunter who was given mokṣa by the sage Uttaṅga. This hunter once made an attempt to steal the gold plates on the roof of the Viṣṇu temple at the palace of Sauvīra. Uttaṅga was present at the temple then and, Gulika tried to kill the sage. The sage cursed him and killed him. Taking pity on him later Uttaṅga sprinkled some water from the river Gaṅgā, on him and the hunter attained Vaikuṇṭha. (Nāradīya Purāna).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Gulika (गुलिक).—A Nāga.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 20. 54.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Kalpa (Formulas, Drug prescriptions and other Medicinal preparations)

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Gulikā (गुलिका, “pill”) is a Sanskrit technical term appearing in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva..—When the powdered drugs are mixed with the syrup of jaggary, sugar or guggulu or ground with water, milk or svarasa and made balls and dried it is known as Guḷikā [Gulikā]. Vaṭaka, vaṭi, modaka, vaṭikā, piṇḍī and varti are its synonyms.

Toxicology (Study and Treatment of poison)

Source: Shodhganga: Kasyapa Samhita—Text on Visha Chikitsa

1) Gulikā (गुलिका) refers to “herbal pills” and represents one of the modes of treatment for the venom (viṣa) of snakes (i.e., viṣacikitsā), as taught in the Viṣacikitsā of the Kāśyapa Saṃhitā: an ancient Sanskrit text from the Pāñcarātra tradition dealing with both Tantra and Viṣacikitsā.—Gulikā or pill is prepared from making a paste of the four products of (bovine) cow-dung, urine, curd and ghee on the fifth day of the dark fortnight. This is a potent anti-venom antidote. Pills made from dung and urine of a new born calf, dried in the shade are said to be always very potent in removing poison; the same mixed with urine can be used as antitode

2 Gulikā (गुलिका) refers to “snakes that has features mixed; limited movement” and represents a classification of Divine Snakes, as taught in the Nāganāman (“names of the Sarpas”) section of the Kāśyapa Saṃhitā.—The first aspect of the Agadatantra is about the names of the sarpas and their features. The Kāśyapasaṃhitā verse IV.6-19 provide information on divine serpents [e.g., Gulikā], their characterstic features, origin and other details.

Unclassified Ayurveda definitions

Source: Ancient Science of Life: Snake bite treatment in Prayoga samuccayam

Gulika (गुलिक) refers to one of the eight primordial snakes, according to the 20th century Prayogasamuccaya (one of the most popular and widely practised book in toxicology in Malayalam).—The work classifies viṣa into two groups, viz. sthāvara and jaṅgama (animate and inanimate). This is followed by a brief description of the origin of snakes. A mythological story is narrated in this context. It is said that in the beginning, there were only 8 snakes, Ananta, Gulika, Vāsuki, Śaṅkhapālaka, Takṣaka, Mahāpadma, Padma and Karkoṭaka and that all other snakes originated from these.

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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Ganitashastra (Mathematics and Algebra)

Source: archive.org: Hindu Mathematics

Gulikā (गुलिका) or “shot” refers to the “unknown quantity”, according to the principles of Bījagaṇita (“algebra” or ‘science of calculation’), according to Gaṇita-śāstra, ancient Indian mathematics and astronomy.—The unknown quantity was called in the Sthānāṅga-sūtra (before 300 B.C.) yāvattāvat (as many as or so much as, meaning an arbitrary quantity). [...] Āryabhaṭa I (499) calls the unknown quantity gulikā (shot). This term strongly leads one to suspect that the shot was probably then used to represent the unknown. From the beginning of the seventh century the Hindu algebraists are found to have more commonly employed the term avyakta (unknown).

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Ganitashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, gaṇitaśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science of mathematics, algebra, number theory, arithmetic, etc. Closely allied with astronomy, both were commonly taught and studied in universities, even since the 1st millennium BCE. Ganita-shastra also includes ritualistic math-books such as the Shulba-sutras.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Gulikā (गुलिका) refers to “pellets”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 6.15cd-18]—“[...] Someone with a diminished body quickly becomes nourished through an oblation of chick-pea sized pellets (gulikāguggulor gulikābhiśca) of the resin of the guggula tree [that have been] oiled three times in strict religious observance. When a man is seen to be afflicted with 100 diseases [and] weak, [he] is released [when the Mantrin] envelops his name [with the mṛtyuñjaya mantra] and recites [it]”.

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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google books: Genesis and Development of Tantra (Shaktism)

Gulikā (गुलिका) refers to a “pill” (of invisibility) and represents one of the various Siddhis (“supernatural powers”) according to the Siddhayogeśvarīmata: an ancient Sanskrit text devoted to cults of Goddesses as the Vidyāpīṭha or Vidyā Corpus.—Although Vedic rituals were a reliable way for the people of ancient India to fulfill their objectives, Tantric rites too claim to bring about the attainment of wishes. [...] In the Siddhayogeśvarīmata, the objectives of the rites are classified as siddhis [e.g., pill-siddhi (a pill, put in the mouth, is said to make one invisible, gulikā-siddhi)]. They belong to the category of supernatural phenomena and seem to be considerably different from the types of wish people expected to gain from the Vedic rituals that still remained within the sphere of everyday life.

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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Shodhganga: Kasyapa Samhita—Text on Visha Chikitsa (p)

Gulika (गुलिक) refers to one of the eight Divine Serpents visualized as the decorations (nāgābharaṇa) of Garuḍa, according to the second chapter of the Kāśyapa Saṃhitā: an ancient Sanskrit text from the Pāñcarātra tradition dealing with both Tantra and Viṣacikitsā (Toxicology).—Accordingly, text text dictates that a Garuḍa-upāsaka, the aspirant, must meditate on Garuḍa of the following form—[...] He shines with his head adorned with a crown, bedecked with jewels, handsome in every limb, with tawny eyes and tremendous speed, shining like gold, long-armed, broad-shouldered and adorned with the eight divine serpents or Nāgas [e.g., Gulika form his right shoulder bands]. Ananta and Gulika form his left and right shoulder bands.

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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Sports, Arts and Entertainment (wordly enjoyments)

Source: archive.org: Syainika Sastra of Rudradeva with English Translation (art)

Gulikā (गुलिका) refers to “pellets” (used as a weapon in hunting), according to the Śyainika-śāstra: a Sanskrit treatise dealing with the divisions and benefits of Hunting and Hawking, written by Rājā Rudradeva (or Candradeva) in possibly the 13th century.—Accordingly, [while discussing the outlines of hawking]: “The Bharadvaja, when pursued by hawks carefully hiding itself and crying piteously, sometimes in a low and sometimes in a loud voice, excites a feeling of laughter, because they hide themselves through fear, but yet can be traced by their cry. The sportsman, seeking amusement, should shoot pellets (gulikā-astra) at them. [...]”.

Arts book cover
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This section covers the skills and profiencies of the Kalas (“performing arts”) and Shastras (“sciences”) involving ancient Indian traditions of sports, games, arts, entertainment, love-making and other means of wordly enjoyments. Traditionally these topics were dealt with in Sanskrit treatises explaing the philosophy and the justification of enjoying the pleasures of the senses.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: De Gruyter: A Buddhist Ritual Manual on Agriculture

Gulikā (गुलिका) (Cf. Guḍikā) refers to “pills” (suitable for an offering ceremony), according to the Vajratuṇḍasamayakalparāja, an ancient Buddhist ritual manual on agriculture from the 5th-century (or earlier), containing various instructions for the Sangha to provide agriculture-related services to laypeople including rain-making, weather control and crop protection.—Accordingly [as the Bhagavān taught the detailed offering-manual], “Pills (gulikā) should be made of pungent mustard seed oil, honey, oleander-flower, nāgapuṣpa and powder. Then the pills (gulikā) should be thrown into the Nāga lake. After the mantra has been recited 108 times, and merely upon throwing [pills] into the lake, all Nāgas rejoice. They send forth great rain showers. If it does not rain on the same day, the bodies of those Nāgas will be destroyed. They will have head diseases, there will be suffering for them”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Gulikā.—cf. pudu-kkuḻigai (SITI), name of a coin; also śeṇapaka-kkuḻigai (SITI), name of a coin probably struck by the Śambuvārāyas; puḻḻi-guḻikai-varāhaṉ (SITI), name of a gold coin; vīracampaṉ-kuḻigai (SITI), a coin struck and issued by the Śambuvarāya king Vīracampa; vāḻāl-vaḻitiṟantāṉ guḻikai (SITI), a Pāṇḍya coin supposed to have been issued by Jaṭā- varman Sundara-pāṇḍya I who had the title Vāḻāl-vaḻi-tiṟantāṉ. Note: gulikā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Gulikā.—same as golakā, etc.; a small coin apparently globular or circular in shape; supposed to be a coin issued by the Śambhuvarāya chiefs and also by the Pāṇḍyas; cf. vīra- champan-kuḻigai and vaḻḻāl-vaḻi-tiṟantāṉ-guḻikai. Note: gulikā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Gulikā.—of the Śambhuvarāya king Vīracampa; see gulikā, etc. Note: gulikā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

See also (synonyms): Vīracampan-guḻigai.

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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

guḷikā : (f.) a pill.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Guḷika, (adj.) (to guḷa3=guṇa, cp. also guṇaka) like a chain, or having a chain, (nt. & f.) a cluster, a chain in maṇi° a string of jewels, a pearl necklace J.III, 184 (v. l. BB for °guḷa); IV, 256; Vism.285 (+muttā-guḷikā). (Page 253)

— or —

Guḷikā, (f.) (to guḷa1; cp. Sk. guṭikā pill, guṇikā tumour) a little ball S.V, 462 (satta-kolaṭṭhi-mattiyo guḷikā, pl.); Th.2, 498 (kolaṭṭhimatta g° balls of the size of a jujube), cp. ThA.289. (Page 253)

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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Gulika (गुलिक).—

1) Name of a minor planet (The son of Saturn).

2) Having a poisoned weapon (= hunter),

3) Name of a country.

4) A quarter-elephant; गुलिको मन्दतनये रस- बद्धास्त्रदेशयोः । दिङ्नागे (guliko mandatanaye rasa- baddhāstradeśayoḥ | diṅnāge) ...... Nm.

Derivable forms: gulikaḥ (गुलिकः).

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Gulikā (गुलिका).—

1) A ball; त्वद्गुच्छावलिमौक्तिकानि गुलिकास्तं राजहंसं विभोः (tvadgucchāvalimauktikāni gulikāstaṃ rājahaṃsaṃ vibhoḥ) N.3.127; a bead; वैढूर्यगुलिकाचितम् (vaiḍhūryagulikācitam) Rām.3.64. 44.

2) A pearl.

3) A bullet; एकापि गुलिका तत्र नलिका- यन्त्रनिर्गता (ekāpi gulikā tatra nalikā- yantranirgatā) Śiva. B.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gulikā (गुलिका).—f.

(-kā) A small ball. E. kan added to gulī.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gulikā (गुलिका).—[feminine] a ball or pill.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Gulikā (गुलिका):—[from gula] a f. (= guḍikā) a ball (as a missile), [Naiṣadha-carita iii, 127]

2) [v.s. ...] a small ball or globule, [Kādambarī] (ifc.)

3) [v.s. ...] a ball for playing with, [Kathāsaritsāgara lxv]

4) [v.s. ...] a pearl ([varia lectio] for guṭikā)

5) [v.s. ...] a pill, [Kathāsaritsāgara lxxxix; Kālacakra]

6) [v.s. ...] ‘a kernel’ See guḍikā

7) [v.s. ...] a head (of cattle), [Āryabhaṭa]

8) Gulika (गुलिक):—m. Name of a hunter, [Bṛhan-nāradīya-purāṇa, 38 adhyāya xxxv]

9) Gulikā (गुलिका):—[from gulika] b f. See gula.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gulikā (गुलिका):—(kā) 1. f. A small ball.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Gulikā (गुलिका) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Guliā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Gulika in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Guḷika (ಗುಳಿಕ):—

1) [noun] (myth.) one of the eight chief serpents.

2) [noun] (astrol.) one of the minor planets, a satellite of Saturn.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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