Gramya, Grāmya, Grāmyā: 12 definitions

Introduction

Gramya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Sushruta samhita, Volume I

Animals such as

  • horses,
  • mules,
  • cows,
  • bullocks,
  • asses,
  • camels,
  • goats,
  • sheep,
  • and Medapuchhas (fat tailed or Turkish sheep) etc.,

belong to the group of domestic animals (Grāmyas).

The flesh of domestic animals is possessed of constructive, tonic and appetising properties, is sweet in taste and digestion. It destroys the deranged Vāyu and produces the Kapham and Pittam.

The Grāmya is a sub-group of the Jāṅghala group (living in high ground and in a jungle).

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Grāmyā (ग्राम्या) is another name for Nīlī, a medicinal plant possibly identified with Indigofera tinctoria Linn. (“true indigo”), according to verse 4.80-83 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Grāmyā and Nīlī, there are a total of thirty Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

Grāmyā (ग्राम्या) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (eg., Grāmyā) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Grāmyā (ग्राम्या).—A mind-born mother.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 179. 15.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

grāmya (ग्राम्य).—a (S) Village-born; produced in or relating to a village. 2 Rustic, homely, clownish, vulgar. 3 Tame--animals, opp. to wild: cultivated--products of the ground, opp. to natural. 4 Used of the Prakrit and the other dialects of India as contrad. from the Sanskrit. 5 Secular, engaged in worldly business: opp. to vanya Living in wilds.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

grāmya (ग्राम्य).—a Village–born, rustic. Tame. Se- cular, not vanya.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Grāmya (ग्राम्य).—a. [grāma-yat]

1) Relating to or used in a village; संत्यज्य ग्राम्यमाहारम् (saṃtyajya grāmyamāhāram) Ms.6.3;7.12.

2) Living in a village, rural, rustic; अल्पव्ययेन सुन्दरि ग्राम्यजनो मिष्टमश्नाति (alpavyayena sundari grāmyajano miṣṭamaśnāti) Chand. M.1.

3) Domesticated, tame (as an animal).

4) Cultivated (opp. vanya 'growing wild').

5) Low, vulgar, used only by low people (as a word); चुम्बनं देहि मे भार्ये कामचाण्डालतृप्तये (cumbanaṃ dehi me bhārye kāmacāṇḍālatṛptaye) R. G., or कटिस्ते हरते मनः (kaṭiste harate manaḥ) S. D.574, are instances of ग्राम्य (grāmya) expressions; तस्मात्संप्रति- पत्तिरेव हि वरं न ग्राम्यमत्रोत्तरम् (tasmātsaṃprati- pattireva hi varaṃ na grāmyamatrottaram) Mu.5.18; Bhāg.5.2.17.

6) Indecent, obscene.

7) Relating to sexual pleasures.

8) Relating to a musical scale.

-myaḥ 1 A villager; Y.2.166.

2) A tame hog.

3) The first two signs of the zodiac, Aries and Taurus.

-myā The Indigo plant.

-myam 1 A rustic speech.

2) Food prepared in a village.

3) Sexual intercourse.

4) Acceptance.

5) The Prakṛt and other dialects.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Grāmya (ग्राम्य).—adj. (in Sanskrit app. only used of speech; Pali gamma used more generally, especially associated with synonymous hīna), vulgar, low: in passage = Pali Vin. i.10.12, hīno grāmyaḥ (sc. antaḥ) Lalitavistara 416.17 and (om. hīno) Mahāvastu iii.331.3; grāmyaṃ nopajīvitaṃ Lalitavistara 262.10, see s.v. upajīvita; grāmyāṃ tṛṣṇāṃ Udānavarga iii.9, 10 = Pali jammī taṇhā Dhammapada (Pali) 335—6.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Grāmya (ग्राम्य).—mfn.

(-myaḥ-myā-myaṃ) 1. Village-born, produced in or relating to a village. 2. Vulgar, rude, rustic. 3. Relating to a musical scale. m.

(-myaḥ) A hog, a tame or a village hog. n.

(-myaṃ) 1. Rustic or homely speech. 2. The Prakrit, and the other dialects of India, except the Sanskrit. E. grāma and yat aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Grāmya (ग्राम्य).—i. e. grāma + ya, I. adj. 1. Referring to villages, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 7, 120. 2. Prepared in villages, Mahābhārata 1, 3637. 3. Inhabiting a village, [Yājñavalkya, (ed. Stenzler.)] 2, 166. 4. Coarse, sensual, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 37, 3. 5. Living in towns, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 11, 199; tame, [Pañcatantra] 68, 14. 6. Cultivated, Mahābhārata 1, 6658. Ii. n. Sensuality, Mahābhārata 2, 2270.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Grāmya (ग्राम्य).—[adjective] village, domestic, cultivated; rustic, vulgar. [masculine] villager, peasant; domestic animal. [neuter] = grāmyadharma [masculine] copulation, lust.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Grāmya (ग्राम्य):—[=grā-mya] [from grāma] a ([according to] to some also) venereal disease, [Kauśika-sūtra]

2) [from grāma] b mfn. ([Pāṇini 4-2, 94]) used or produced in a village, [Taittirīya-saṃhitā v; Aitareya-brāhmaṇa vii, 7, 1; Kauśika-sūtra]

3) [v.s. ...] relating to villages, [Manu-smṛti vii, 120]

4) [v.s. ...] prepared in a village (as food), [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa ix, xii; Manu-smṛti vi, 3]

5) [v.s. ...] living (in villages id est.) among men, domesticated, tame (an animal), cultivated (a plant; opposed to vanya or araṇya, ‘wild’), [Ṛg-veda x, 90, 8; Atharva-veda; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā] etc.

6) [v.s. ...] allowed in a village, relating to the sensual pleasures of a village, [Mahābhārata xii, 4069; Rāmāyaṇa iii f.; Bhāgavata-purāṇa iv, vi]

7) [v.s. ...] rustic, vulgar (speech), [Vāmana’s Kāvyālaṃkāravṛtti ii, 1, 4]

8) [v.s. ...] (See -tā and -tva)

9) [v.s. ...] relating to a musical scale, [Horace H. Wilson]

10) [v.s. ...] m. a villager, [Yājñavalkya ii, 166; Mahābhārata xiii; Bhāgavata-purāṇa] etc.

11) [v.s. ...] a domesticated animal See -māṃsa

12) [v.s. ...] = ma-kola, [Horace H. Wilson]

13) [v.s. ...] n. rustic or homely speech, [Horace H. Wilson]

14) [v.s. ...] the Prākṛt and the other dialects of India as contra-distinguished from the Sanskṛt, [Horace H. Wilson]

15) [v.s. ...] food prepared in a village, [Mahābhārata i, 3637; Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra xxii [Scholiast or Commentator]]

16) [v.s. ...] sensual pleasure, sexual intercourse, [Mahābhārata ii, 2270; Bhāgavata-purāṇa iv]

17) Grāmyā (ग्राम्या):—[from grāmya > grāma] f. = miṇī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

18) [v.s. ...] = ma-ja-niṣpāvī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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