Golaka, Goḷaka: 19 definitions

Introduction:

Golaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Goḷaka can be transliterated into English as Golaka or Goliaka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Golak.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Golaka (गोलक).—A disciple of Śākalya.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 60. 64.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: eScholarship: Chapters 1-14 of the Hayasirsa Pancaratra

Golaka (गोलक) refers to “one who is a widow’s bastard”, representing an undesirable characteristic of an Ācārya, according to the 9th-century Hayaśīrṣa-pañcarātra Ādikāṇḍa chapter 3.—The Lord said:—“I will tell you about the Sthāpakas endowed with perverse qualities. He should not construct a temple with those who are avoided in this Tantra. [...] He should not be a Punarbhū, a Svayambhū, a widow’s bastard (golaka), or a non-believer, nor irrational, pale, bald or crippled or fat. [...] A god enshrined by any of these named above (viz., golaka), is in no manner a giver of fruit. If a building for Viṣṇu is made anywhere by these excluded types (viz., golaka) then that temple will not give rise to enjoyment and liberation and will yield no reward, of this there is no doubt”.

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: academia.edu: Religious Inclusivism in the Writings of an Early Modern Sanskrit Intellectual (Shaivism)

Golaka (गोलक) (Cf. Vyavasthā) refers to a “widow’s bastard”.—[...] According to Appaya, there is no conflict if one understands that a limited reference (vyavasthā) is implicit: the Pāñcarātra is authoritative for certain groups of people only and it is for their sake that praising statements are made in smṛti. In fact, says Appaya, the ‘valid’ teachings of the Pāñcarātra concern only non-Vedic adhikārins such as kuṇḍas (son of a woman by another man than her husband), golakas (widow’s bastard), women, śūdras, and so on; other teachings for which Vedic eligibility is required have no authority whatsoever. The important point here is that the Pāñcarātra is authoritative only to a certain extent and outside the Vedic realm.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Golakā.—(SITI), also called gulikā, goḻakkai, koḻakkai, kuḻigai; name of a coin, probably circular in shape. Note: golakā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Golakā.—same as gulikā, etc. Note: golakā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

goḷaka : (m.; nt.) a ball.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Goḷaka, a ball ThA.255 (kīḷā°). (Page 256)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

gōlaka (गोलक).—(S) A caste or an individual of it. It is composed of the descendents from illegitimate offspring of Brahman-widows. There are two distinctions--kuṇḍagōlaka Illegitimate offspring of a (esp. Brahman) woman having a husband, and raṇḍagōlaka Illegitimate offspring of a (Brahman) widow. 2 Any thing globular, a ball, an orb, a sphere. 3 In the sense Ball with some accommodation gōlaka is attached severally to the names of the organs of the senses; as karṇagōlaka the auricle of the ear, nāsāgōlaka the body of the nose, nētragōlaka the ball of the eye, mukhagōlaka the mouth: also indriyagōlaka an organ of sense, or indriyagōlaka pl the organs of sense. Ex. dēvatāśakti asalyāvāṃ- cūna kēvala indriyagōlakānnī kārya hōta nāhīṃ. See adhidēvata, adhibhūta, & adhyātmā.

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gōlaka (गोलक).—n ( P) A closed box with a slit to receive money, a money-box, a till.

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gōḷaka (गोळक).—m A caste. See gōlaka.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Golaka (गोलक).—[guḍ ṇvula ḍasya laḥ]

1) A ball, globe; भूगोलकविशेषं नामरूपमानलक्षणतो व्याख्यास्यामः (bhūgolakaviśeṣaṃ nāmarūpamānalakṣaṇato vyākhyāsyāmaḥ) Bhāg.5.16.4.

2) A wooden ball for playing with.

3) A globular waterjar.

4) A widow's bastard; परदारेषु जायेते द्वौ सुतौ कुण्ड- गोलकौ । पत्यौ जीवति कुण्डः स्यान्मृते भर्तरि गोलकः (paradāreṣu jāyete dvau sutau kuṇḍa- golakau | patyau jīvati kuṇḍaḥ syānmṛte bhartari golakaḥ) || Ms.3.174.

5) A conjunction of six or more planets in one sign.

6) Glans penis.

7) Molasses.

8) Gum myrrh.

Derivable forms: golakaḥ (गोलकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Golaka (गोलक).—(m. or nt.; compare prec.; Sanskrit Lex. bottle), a bottle- [Page217-b+ 71] shaped (or ball-shaped ?) ornament on a building (this is a meaning of Tibetan bum pa, see under prec.): (nagaraṃ…) aṭṭāla-(mss aṭṭala-)-golaka-(v.l. goraka)-toraṇaṃ Mahāvastu iii.160.13 (prose).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Golaka (गोलक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A wooden ball for playing with, or any thing globular, a sphere, a globe, &c. 2. A widow’s bastard. 3. A water jar. 4. Gum myrrh, 5. Pease. n.

(-kaṃ) The heaven of Krishna. E. kan added to the preceding. guḍa-ṇvul ḍasya laḥ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Golaka (गोलक).—[gola + ka], m. 1. A ball, as the Kadamba's round flower, Bhāṣāp. p. 165 (v. r.); ū-, m. The earth, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 5, 16, 4. 2. A widow’s bastard, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 3, 156; 174.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Golaka (गोलक).—[masculine] ball, globe; a widow’s bastard.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Golaka (गोलक):—[from gola] m. a ball or globe, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa v, 16, 4; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā xxxi, 22 [Scholiast or Commentator]] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] a ball for playing with, [Harivaṃśa 15549]

3) [v.s. ...] glans penis, [Sāyaṇa on Aitareya-brāhmaṇa i, 20]

4) [v.s. ...] a kind of pease (= palāśa), [Gobhila-śrāddha-kalpa iv, 4, 26; Śāṅkhāyana-gṛhya-sūtra iv, 19, 4]

5) [v.s. ...] myrrh, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] a globular water-jar, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] a kind of dish, [Demetrius Galanos’s Lexiko: sanskritikes, anglikes, hellenikes]

8) [v.s. ...] a widow’s bastard, [Manu-smṛti iii, 156 and 174; Mahābhārata iii, 13366]

9) [v.s. ...] the conjunction of all the planets in one sign, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhajjātaka xii, 3 and 19]

10) [v.s. ...] Name of a pupil of Deva-mitra, [Vāyu-purāṇa i, 60, 64]

11) [v.s. ...] n. a ball or globe, [Nyāyamālā-vistara [Scholiast or Commentator]]

12) [v.s. ...] = go-loka, Tantr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Golaka (गोलक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. A wooden play ball, a globe; pease; water-jar; myrrh. n. Krishna's heaven.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Golaka (गोलक) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Golaga, Golaya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Golaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Golaka (गोलक) [Also spelled golak]:—(nm) see [gullaka]; ball (as eye-ball [netra]~).

context information

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Gōlaka (ಗೋಲಕ):—

1) [noun] any round body or figure having the surface equally distant from the centre at all points; a globe; a ball.

2) [noun] any of the openings (as of sensory organs such as the eye, ear, nose, etc.) 3) the round, pigmented membrane surrounding the pupil of the eye, having muscles that adjust the size of the pupil to regulate the amount of light entering the eye; the iris.

3) [noun] an electric light bulb.

4) [noun] a closed box or a round container with a slit at the top for inserting monetary coins, used as a money box.

5) [noun] an illegitimate son of a widow.

6) [noun] a small ball, tablet, capsule, etc. of medicine usu. to be swallowed whole; a pill.

7) [noun] the churned curd.

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Gōḷaka (ಗೋಳಕ):—

1) [noun] any round body or figure having the surface equally distant from the centre at all points; a globe; a ball.

2) [noun] any of the openings (as of sensory organs such as the eye, ear, nose, etc.) 3) the round, pigmented membrane surrounding the pupil of the eye, having muscles that adjust the size of the pupil to regulate the amount of light entering the eye; the iris.

3) [noun] an electric light bulb.

4) [noun] a closed box or a round container with a slit at the top for inserting monetary coins, used as a money box.

5) [noun] an illegitimate son of a widow.

6) [noun] a small ball, tablet, capsule, etc. of medicine usu. to be swallowed whole; a pill.

7) [noun] the churned curd.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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