Ghatin, Ghaṭi, Ghaṭī, Ghātin, Ghaṭin, Ghāti, Ghati: 34 definitions

Introduction:

Ghatin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wikibooks (hi): Sanskrit Technical Terms

Ghaṭī (घटी).—A unit of time equal to 24 minutes. Note: Ghaṭī is a Sanskrit technical term used in ancient Indian sciences such as Astronomy, Mathematics and Geometry.

Source: INSA Digital Repository: Determination of Ascensional Difference in the Lagnaprakarana

Ghaṭī (घटी) refers to a “clock”, according to verse 24 of the Lagnaprakaraṇa (lit. “treatise for the computation of the ascendant), an astronomical work in eight chapters dealing with the determination of the ascendant (udayalagna or orient ecliptic point).—Accordingly, “At sunrise, the ascensional difference is positive or negative depending on [the Sun’s position with regard to] Libra or Aries. While setting, it is otherwise. That should not be applied during midst of the day and night. And in case of third, fifth etc. portions [of the day, the cara] should be calculated [afresh] successively. The rule of proportion for this will not be applicable in [setting] the motion of the clock (ghaṭī-prasāra)”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Advances in Zoology and Botany: Ethnomedicinal List of Plants Treating Fever in Ahmednagar District of Maharashtra, India

Ghāṭī in the Marathi language refers to the medicinal herb “Rungia repens (L) Nees”, and is used for ethnomedicine treatment of Fever in Ahmednagar district, India. The parts used are: “Whole plant”.

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Ghaṭī (घटी):—A measure of time; equals 24 minutes

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

1) Ghātin (घातिन्) refers to a unit of time-measurement, consisting of 69 palas, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.10, while explaining the span of life of the deities (Brahmā, Viṣṇu and Hara):—“[...] in the case of all living beings, Brahmā, Viṣṇu, Hara, Gandharvas, serpents, Rākṣasas, etc., twenty one thousand six hundred respirations constitute the period of one day and one night (ahorātra), O foremost among Devas. Six respirations constitute the period of time one Pala. Sixty such Palas constitute one Ghaṭī. Sixty Ghaṭīs constitute one day and one night. (6 x 60 x 60 = 21600). There is no limit to the number of respirations of Sadāśiva. Hence He is undecaying”.

2) Ghātin (घातिन्) refers to “one who is slaughtering”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.33 (“The appeasement of Himavat”).—Accordingly, as Vasiṣṭha said to Himavat (Himācala): “[...] Śiva, the lord of gods, is devoid of riches created by Brahmā. But His mind is engrossed in the ocean of true knowledge. How can lord Śiva who is knowledge-Bliss Himself have any desire for articles created by Brahmā? An ordinary householder gives his daughter to one who has a kingdom and riches in his possession? By offering his daughter to a miserable person, a father may be guilty of slaughtering his daughter (kanyā-ghātin). Who can think Śiva miserable whose servant is Kubera? [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Ghaṭī (घटी) refers to a “clock”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Those who are wise speak about momentariness with the striking of the clock of kings (ghaṭī-ghātaghaṭīghātena bhūbhṛtām). The betterment of oneself must be accomplished. That [time] which is past will not return”.

Synonyms: Ghaṭikā.

Note: The Hindi explanation (JA[S] 3rd ed. p. 27-8) differs slightly from the commentary in its reading of this verse. It says that the sages have explained the transitoriness of animate and inanimate objects with the striking of the clock (ghaṭī-ghāta) of kings. This means that just as a clock indicates minutes and hours by striking on time so it also indicates the destruction of things according to the passage of time. The reason Śubhacandra refers to the striking of the clock of kings is due to the fact that, as laid down in the Arthaśāstra (attributed to Kauṭilya), from ancient times in India it was one of the responsibilities of a king to keep the time (Pargiter 1915: 699).

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Google Books: Studies in the History of the Exact Sciences (history)

Ghaṭī (घटी) or Ghaṭikā refers to a “hemispherical bowl”.—From about the fourth century A.D. up to recent times the water clock of the sinking bowl type (Ghaṭikā or Ghaṭīyantra) has been the chief device in India for measuring time. The instrument consists of a hemispherical bowl (ghaṭikā or ghaṭī) with a minute perforation at the bottom. When this bowl is placed on the surface of water in a larger vessel or basin (kuṇḍa, kuṇḍikā, kuṇḍī), water slowly percolates into the bowl through the perforation. When the bowl is full, it sinks to the bottom of the vessel with a clearly audible thud. The weight of the vessel and the size of the perforation are so regulated that the bowl sinks sixty times in a nychthemeron (ahorātra). Thus the time taken for filling the bowl once is one-sixtieth part of a nychthemeron, or twenty-four minutes. This was the standard unit of time measurement in India and is called ghaṭikā or ghaṭī after the name of the bowl. The ghaṭikā is subdivided into sixty vighaṭikās, which are also called palas.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Ghaṭi or Ghaṭī.—(CII 3), same as ghaṭikā, the sixtieth division of a day (i. e. day and night); equal to twentyfour English minutes. Cf. ghaḍīyāramu. Note: ghaṭi is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Ghaṭī.—(CII 4), name of a measure of capacity. Note: ghaṭī is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Ghati in India is the name of a plant defined with Solanum nigrum in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Solanum nigrum var. atriplicifolium G. Meyer (among others).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Journal of the Indian Botanical Society (1986)
· Indian Journal of Genetics and Plant Breeding (1980)
· Plantas Indian National Science Academy. Part B, Biological Sciences (1983)
· Feddes Repertorium (1990)
· Journal of Cytology and Genetics (1984)
· Botaniceskjij Žurnal SSSR (1984)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Ghati, for example chemical composition, pregnancy safety, health benefits, side effects, diet and recipes, extract dosage, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
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This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

ghaṭi : (aor. of ghaṭati) tried; strived; exerted oneself. || ghaṭī (f.), water-pot. ghātī (m.), one who kills, robs, or destroys.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Ghaṭī, (f.) (to ghaṭa1) a jar DhA.I, 426. In cpds. also ghaṭi°.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Ghātin, (adj.-n.) killing; a murderer J.I, 168 (pāṇa°); VI, 67 (ghātimhi=ghātake). (Page 257)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ghaṭī (घटी).—f S A period of sixty pala or twenty-four minutes. 2 The ghaḍī or Indian clock, a plate of iron or mixed metal on which the hours are struck. 3 The metal sinking cup. 4 A small jar or vessel. Ex. kācaghaṭī, tāmraghaṭī, mṛdghaṭī, suvarṇaghaṭī.

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ghāṭī (घाटी).—a (ghāṭa) Relating to the Desh or country above the Sayhadri range. As ghāṭavaḷa is used particularly of the people, so is this word particularly of the products or animals of the Desh.

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ghāṭī (घाटी).—f (Dim. of ghāṭa) A little ghāṭa, a hill passage of milder ascent.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ghaṭī (घटी).—f A period of 24 minutes. The metal sinking cup, a small jar or vessel.

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ghāṭī (घाटी).—a (ghāṭa) Relating to the Desh, par- ticularly the products or animals of the Desh.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ghaṭin (घटिन्).—m. The sign Aquarius of the zodiac (also called kumbha).

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Ghātin (घातिन्).—a. (- f.) [इन् णिच् णिनि (in ṇic ṇini)]

1) Striking, killing ये च स्त्रीबालघातिनः (ye ca strībālaghātinaḥ) Manusmṛti 8.89.

2) Catching or killing (birds &c.)

3) Destructive.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ghaṭī (घटी):—[from ghaṭa > ghaṭ] a f. a water-jar, [Prabodha-candrodaya ii, 7/8]

2) [v.s. ...] (also ṭi q.v.; cf. ṭī-ghaṭa) a period of time (= 24 minutes) [Scholiast or Commentator] on [Yājñavalkya ii, 100-102] and on [Sūryasiddhānta i, 25]

3) [v.s. ...] the Ghārī or Indian clock (plate of iron or mixed metal on which the hours are struck), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] a particular procession, [Purāṇa-sarvasva] (cf. dur-, bhadra-.)

5) Ghaṭi (घटि):—[from ghaṭ] 1. ghaṭi f. = ṭī q.v., [Uṇādi-sūtra iv, 117 [Scholiast or Commentator]]

6) [from ghaṭ] 2. ghaṭi in [compound] for ṭin.

7) Ghaṭī (घटी):—[from ghaṭ] b f. of ṭa q.v.

8) Ghāti (घाति):—[from ghāta] 1. ghāti f. a blow, wound, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] catching or killing birds, fowling, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] a bird-net, [Uṇādi-sūtra iv, 124.]

11) [v.s. ...] 2. ghāti in [compound] for tin.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Ghaṭin (घटिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ghaḍi, Ghāi.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ghātin (घातिन्):—[(tī-tinī-ti) a.] Murderous.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ghāti (घाति):—(ti) 2. m. Catching or killing birds, &c.; striking.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ghaṭī (घटी).—

1) A small jar.

2) A measure of time equal to 24 minutes.

3) A small water-pot used in calculating the Ghaṭikās or time of the day; घटी चेटी विटः किं स्विज्जानात्यमरकामिनीम् (ghaṭī ceṭī viṭaḥ kiṃ svijjānātyamarakāminīm) Udb.

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Ghāti (घाति).—[in ṇic iṇ]

1) Striking, killing.

2) Catching or killing birds, -f. A bird-net.

Derivable forms: ghātiḥ (घातिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ghaṭin (घटिन्):—[from ghaṭ] m. ‘having a water-jar’, the sign Aquarius, [Horāśāstra]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of Śiva, [Mahābhārata xii, 10419.]

3) Ghātin (घातिन्):—[from ghāta] mfn. ([Pāṇini 3-2, 51 and 86]) ifc. killing, murderous, murderer, [Manu-smṛti viii, 89; Yājñavalkya; Mahābhārata] etc.

4) [v.s. ...] destroying, ruining, destructive[, iii, 63; Rāmāyaṇa iii, v]

5) [v.s. ...] f. = tanī, [Uṇādi-sūtra iv, 124 [Scholiast or Commentator]] (cf. andhaka-, amitra-, ardhaka-, ātma-, etc.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ghātin (घातिन्).—[adjective] = ghātaka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ghātin (घातिन्).—i. e. han, [Causal.], + in, adj. and s., f. . 1. Killing, Mahābhārata 3, 17198; a murderer, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 8, 89. 2. Destroying, Mahābhārata 3, 63.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ghātin (घातिन्).—mfn. (-tī-tinī-ti) Murderous, felonious, who or what strikes or kills. E. han to kill, ṇini aff. hana-tācchīlyārthe ṇin .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ghāti (घाति).—m.

(-tiḥ) 1. Catching or killing birds, fowling. 2. killing in general. 3. Striking. E. han to kill or hurt, affix iṇ, and the radical changed: see ghāta.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Ghāṭin (घाटिन्).—adj. (= ghātin, compare § 2.41), destroying: jaga-kleśa-ghāṭī Daśabhūmikasūtra.g. 41(67).14 (no v.l.).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Ghaṭi (घटि).—(f. ? compare Pali ghaṭikā, small stick), stick, piece of wood: samudramadhye patitā kecid ghaṭim (v.l. vṛttim) ādāya kecit phalakaṃ kecid alābuśreṇiyaṃ Mahāvastu iii.68.5 (prose).

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Ghaṭī (घटी) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ghaḍi, Ghaḍī.

[Sanskrit to German]

Ghatin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Ghāṭī (घाटी):—(nf) a valley; mountain pass.

2) Ghātī (घाती):—(nm) a killer, assassin; slaughterer; trickster; (a) cunning and crafty.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Ghaṭi (ಘಟಿ):—

1) [noun] a small water jar; an earthen pot.

2) [noun] a duration of twenty-four minutes.

3) [noun] a metal plate that resounds when struck, used to give signals or communicate the duration of the time; a gong.

4) [noun] a glass container, holding sand that takes one hour to tickle from upper to lower section through a narrow opening; an hour-glass.

5) [noun] a device used to draw water from a well.

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Ghāṭi (ಘಾಟಿ):—

1) [noun] a long, narrow root between hills or mountains.

2) [noun] a stretch of low land (lying by a hill or mountain).

3) [noun] a flight of steps leading to water (or bed) of a tank, river, etc.

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Ghāṭi (ಘಾಟಿ):—[noun] an intelligent, shrewd but mischievous person.

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Ghāti (ಘಾತಿ):—[adjective] = ಘಾತಕ [ghataka]1.

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Ghāti (ಘಾತಿ):—[[]] []

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Ghāti (ಘಾತಿ):—

1) [noun] an instance of striking, as with the fist, a weapon or a hammer; a blow; a stroke.

2) [noun] the end of life; death; the state of being annihilated; extinction; destruction.

3) [noun] the act or an instance of killing.

4) [noun] a fowleṛs net for catching birds.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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