Ghasmari, Ghasmarī: 4 definitions

Introduction:

Ghasmari means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhist Teachers, Deities and other Spiritual beings

Ghasmarī (घस्मरी) refers to one of the “Fifty-eight Wrathful Deities” (Tibetan: khro bo lha nga brgyad) according to various sources such as the Guhyagarbha Tantra and the Tibetan Book of the Dead.—They feature in Tantric teachings and practices which focus on purifying elements of the body and mind. These deities [e.g., Ghasmarī] form part part of the the Hundred Peaceful and Wrathful Deities who manifest to a deceased person following the dissolution of the body and consciousness whilst they are in the intermediate state (bardo) between death and rebirth. Ghasmarī is part of the “eight wrathful females” and is also known in Tibetan as (1) kas ma ri (2) sme sha can (3) g+ha sma ri (4) g+hasma ri.

Source: archive.org: The Indian Buddhist Iconography

Ghasmarī (घस्मरी) refers one of the eight Gaurīs, commonly depicted in Buddhist Iconography, and mentioned in the 11th-century Niṣpannayogāvalī of Mahāpaṇḍita Abhayākara.—Her Colour is green; her Symbol is the bell; she has two arms.—The fourth goddess in the Gaurī group is Ghasmarī.

Ghasmarī is described in the Niṣpannayogāvalī (pañcaḍāka-maṇḍala) as follows:—

“Ghasmarī is green in colour and holds in her right hand the bell marked with a vajra”.

[The left shows the common gesture of tarjanī.

All the deities are violent in character with fearful appearance and ornaments, and garlands of heads. They dance in pratyālīḍha and show the raised index finger with clasped fist against the chest, as the common gesture.]

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Ghasmarī (घस्मरी) is also mentioned as the Ḍākinī of the southern gate in the Jñānacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the jñānacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the saṃbhoga-puṭa (‘enjoyment layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The four gate Ḍākinīs [viz., Ghasmarī] each has the same physical feature as the four Ḍākinīs starting with Lāmā.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Ghasmarī (घस्मरी).—name of a yoginī: Sādhanamālā 446.2.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of ghasmari in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

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