Ghanta, Ghaṇṭā, Ghaṇṭa, Ghamta: 40 definitions

Introduction:

Ghanta means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Google Books: Cultural History from the Vāyu Purāna

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा)—One of the Heavenly ornaments according to the Vāyu Purāṇa. (It is not certain whether it was an ornament) Śiva is often associated with its use. He loved a garland of bells. He is called ghaṇṭā-priya and ghaṇṭīka.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Ghaṇṭa (घण्ट).—A brahmin born in Vasiṣṭha’s family. He spent hundred years worshipping Śiva. Once Ghaṇṭa asked sage Devala to give his daughter in marriage to him. But Ghaṇṭa’s ugliness stood in the way. So he abducted the daughter of the sage and married her. Enraged at this Devala cursed and turned him into an owl. He was also given redemption from the curse that he would regain his form the day he helped Indradyumna. (Skanda Purāṇa).

2) Ghaṇṭa (घण्ट).—See under Ghaṇṭākarṇa.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा, “shining, splendid”):—Name of one of the sixty-four mātṛs to be worshipped during Āvaraṇapūjā (“Worship of the Circuit of Goddesses”, or “Durgā’s Retinue”), according to the Durgāpūjātattva. They should be worshipped with either the five upācāras or perfume and flowers.

Her mantra is as follows:

ॐ घण्टायै नमः
oṃ ghaṇṭāyai namaḥ.

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा) refers to the “bell” and as one of the weapons (attributes) of Goddess Kubjikā symbolizes “the arising of correct knowledge of mantra”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “(Now) I will tell (you about) the great weapons of that (goddess) Kubjikā. [...] A correct knowledge of mantra arises by means of the bell [i.e., ghaṇṭā] and a correct understanding of the scriptures from the book. Control (of others is acquired) by means of the bow and the great accomplishment of (all) the weapons in the Mahāmata by means of the skull”.

Source: Kamakoti Mandali: The Yoginis of Narasimha Vyuha

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा) is the name of a Mātṛkā-Śakti created by Mahārudra in order to control the plague of demons created by Andhakāsura.—Accordingly, Andhaka-Asura tried to kidnap Umā (Devī Pārvatī), and was fiercely attacked by Mahārudra who shot arrows at him from his mahāpināka. when the arrows pierced the body of Andhakāsura, drops of blood fell to earth and from those drops, thousands of Andhakas arose. To control this plague of demons, Mahārudra created Mātṛkā-Śaktis [viz., Ghaṇṭā] and ordered them to drink the blood of the demons and drain them dry.

Source: Kamakoti Mandali: Nrisimha matrika-mandala

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा) refers to one of the various Mātṛkā-Śaktis created by Rudra in order to destroy the clones that spawned from Andhaka’s body.—Accordingly, [...] Andhakāsura attempted to abduct Girājanandinī (Pārvatī) and thus ensued a fierce battle between Andhakāsura and the great Rudra, the Lord of Umā. Like raktabīja, every drop of blood that fell from the body of Andhaka created another Asura like him and in no time, the entire world was filled with Andhakas. To destroy the growing number of Andhakas, Rudra created innumerable Mātṛkā-Śaktis [viz., Ghaṇṭā]. These Śaktis of immense power at once began to drink every drop of blood that flowed from the body of Andhaka, but they could still not effectively contain the emergence of more and more demons.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा):—Sanskrit name of one of the thirty-two female deities of the Somamaṇḍala (second maṇḍala of the Khecarīcakra) according to the kubjikāmata-tantra. These goddesses are situated on a ring of sixteen petals and represent the thirty-two syllables of the Aghoramantra. Each deity (including Ghaṇṭā) is small, plump and large-bellied. They can assume any form at will, have sixteen arms each, and are all mounted on a different animal.

Source: academia.edu: The Yoga of the Mālinīvijayottaratantra

Ghaṇṭa (घण्ट) refers to one of the ten kinds of sounds (śabda) according to the Matsyendrasaṃhitā.

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा) refers to a “bell”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 11.1-24ab, while describing the appearance and worship of Tumburu]—“[...] The Devīs are white, red, yellow, and black, four-faced, four armed, three eyed, and in [their] hands bear golden hatchets, sticks and rosaries. [...] Ajitā [is yellow, like] the calyx of a lotus. Four-faced and four-armed, [she] bears a spear and a bell (śākti-ghaṇṭā-dharā) and rests on a flat hide. [...] [When one] worships and meditates on [the Devīs, as they] stand in the cardinal directions, [the Devīs grant the practitioner] the fruits of siddhi. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography

Ghaṇṭā (or, the bell) is another musical instrument, which is generally found in the hands of Vīrabhadra and Kālī.

Source: Red Zambala: Hindu Icons and Symbols | Introduction

Ghaṇṭā (Bell) - Impermanence. The phenomenal world which is impermanent and evanescent. Creation of the transient universe through sound — being perceived but not held and kept.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)

1) Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा, “bell”) refers to a type of musical instrument, representing one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “accessories” of a detiy commonly seen depicted in Hindu iconography, defined according to texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—Ghaṇṭā or the bell is another musical instrument, which is generally found in the hands of Vīrabhadra and Kālī.

2) Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Ghaṇṭa forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Ākāśacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the ākāśacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the dharma-puṭa (‘dharma layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Ghaṇṭā] and Vīras are dark blue in color; they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife. Alternatively, the Ḍākinīs have their own marks and motions according to the taste instead of a small drum and a skull staff.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Ghaṇṭa (घण्ट) is the name of a Dānava, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 121. Accordingly, “... long ago there came to impede Prajāpati, in his creation of creatures, two terrible Dānavas, named Ghaṇṭa and Nighaṇṭa, invincible even by gods. And the Creator, being desirous of destroying them, created these two maidens, the splendour of whose measureless beauty seemed capable of maddening the world”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Ghaṇṭa, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा) refers to a “bell”, according to Bāṇa’s Kādambarī (p. 224).—Accordingly, “[From afar] Candrāpīḍa first sees a ‘crimson ensign’, inscribing the sky with a gold trident, from which swung a terrifying bell (ghora-ghaṇṭā) making a raucous clanging that dangled down from an iron chain attached to the tip, arranged with a yak-tail whisk as splendid as a lion’s mane”.

Kavya book cover
context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा) is another name for Atibalā, a medicinal plant identified with Abutilon indicum Linn. (“Indian mallow”) from the Malvaceae or mallows family of flowering plants, according to verse 4.101-102 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Ghaṇṭā and Atibalā, there are a total of ten Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा) is the name of Dūtī (i.e., messengers of Lord Vajrapāṇi) mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Ghaṇṭā).

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

1) Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा) refers to a “bell” and represents one of the items held in the left hand of Heruka: one of the main deities of the Herukamaṇḍala described in the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Heruka is positioned in the Lotus (padma) at the center; He is the origin of all heroes; He has 17 faces (with three eyes on each) and 76 arms [holding, for example, ghaṇṭā]; He is half black and half green in color; He is dancing on a flaming sun placed on Bhairava and Kālarātrī.

2) Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Ghaṇṭa forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Ākāśacakra, according to the same work. Accordingly, the ākāśacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the dharma-puṭa (‘dharma layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Ghaṇṭā] and Vīras are dark blue in color; they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife. Alternatively, the Ḍākinīs have their own marks and motions according to the taste instead of a small drum and a skull staff.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (tantric Buddhism)

Ghaṇṭa (घण्ट) refers to a “bell”, according to the Bhūśalyasūtrapātananimittavidhi section of Jagaddarpaṇa’s Ācāryakriyāsamuccaya, a text within Tantric Buddhism dealing with construction manual for monasteries etc.—Accordingly, “[...] Having praised [the cord] with the sounds of a bell (ghaṇṭa), auspicious song, conch shell, and bamboo flute, the donor should offer guest water [to the cord] together with jewels, gold, and fragrant flowers, which are blooming and beautiful, and mixed with the juice extracted from the sprouts of the airandhrīkara”.

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा) refers to one of the attributes used to describe Cakrasaṃvara, according to the Saṃvaramaṇḍala of Abhayākaragupta’s Niṣpannayogāvalī, p. 45 and n. 145; (Cf. Cakrasaṃvaratantra, Gray, David B., 2007).—Accordingly, [while describing the iconography of Cakrasaṃvara]: “In the Saṃvara Maṇḍala atop Mount Sumera within a vajra-canopy there is a variegated lotus, on top of that a palace, in the middle of which is the Blessed Lord, standing in ālīḍhāsana, "archer's pose", [...] possessing a vyāghracarma, "tiger skin" and twelve arms, the foremost arms holding a vajra and ghaṇṭā, embracing Vajravārāhī, the uppermost arms holding a gajacarman, "elephant skin", [...]”.

Note: The vajra and ghaṇṭā symbolizes mastering the skill (upāya) of wielding emptiness (śūnyatā).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: De Gruyter: A Buddhist Ritual Manual on Agriculture

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा) refers to a “bell” (suitable for an offering ritual), according to the Vajratuṇḍasamayakalparāja, an ancient Buddhist ritual manual on agriculture from the 5th-century (or earlier), containing various instructions for the Sangha to provide agriculture-related services to laypeople including rain-making, weather control and crop protection.—Accordingly, [as the Bhagavān teaches the offering of the root spell], “[...] A bell (ghaṇṭā) should be fixed at the top of the jars. Nalada, sarja-resin, olibanum, nakha, nāgapuṣpa and white mustard should be joined with candied sugar. These should be enchanted with the mantra 108 times. Incense should be offered by that. This incense should be used everywhere. [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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India history and geography

Source: Singhi Jain Series: Ratnaprabha-suri’s Kuvalayamala-katha (history)

Ghaṃṭā (घंटा) refers to one of the various shops or “market places” (Sanskrit: Haṭṭa, Prakrit: Cauhaṭṭa) for a medieval town in ancient India, which were vividly depicted in Kathās (narrative poems), for example, by Uddyotanasūri in his 8th-century Kuvalayamālā.—The Kuvalayamala (779 A.D.) is full of cultural material which gains in value because of the firm date of its composition. [...] In the Kuvalayamālā, some names of shops according to articles displayed in them is given, [i.e., ghaṃṭā] [...] Thus Uddyotana has in his view a complete form of a medieval market place with the number of lines full of different commodities.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Ghanta in India is the name of a plant defined with Abutilon guineense in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Abutilon indicum var. guineense (Schumach. (among others).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Det Kongelige Danske Videnskabernes Selskabs Naturvidenskabelige og Mathematiske Afhandlinger (1829)
· Journal of Botany, British and Foreign (1936)
· Species Plantarum (1753)
· Acta Botanica Yunnanica (1982)
· Flora of China (1955)
· Blumea (1966)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Ghanta, for example pregnancy safety, side effects, diet and recipes, chemical composition, extract dosage, health benefits, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

ghaṇṭā : (f.) a bell.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Ghaṇṭā, (f.) a small bell (cp. kiṅkanikā) J.IV, 215; VvA.36, 37, 279 (khuddaka°). As ghaṇṭī at Vism.181. (Page 256)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ghaṇṭā (घंटा).—f (S) A bell: also a plate of iron or mixed metal struck as a bell, or in telling the hours. ghaṇṭā vājaṇēṃ g. of s. Also ghaṇṭā hālaṇēṃ To be exhausted, spent, consumed; to be out or clean gone.

--- OR ---

ghāṇṭa (घांट).—f (ghaṇṭā S) A bell. 2 fig. A blab.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ghaṇṭā (घंटा).—f The bell. ghaṇṭā vājaṇēṃ Be ex- hausted, spent, consumed. Be out or clean gone.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ghaṇṭa (घण्ट).—a. Shining, splendid

-ṇṭaḥ 1 Name of Śiva.

2) A kind of sauce, a kind of dish.

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Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा).—[ghaṇṭ-ac]

1) A bell.

2) A plate of iron or mixed metal struck as a clock.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Ghaṇṭa (घण्ट).—(?) (in Sanskrit name of a Dānava), name of a rākṣasa king: (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa 18.1; but see Yama (3).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ghaṇṭa (घण्ट).—m.

(-ṇṭaḥ) A sort of sauce, vegetables made into a pulp with water, turmeric, mustard seeds and capsicums. f.

(-ṇṭā) 1. A bell; also a plate of iron or mixed metal struck as a bell. 2. A plant: see ghaṇṭāpāṭalī E. ghana to strike, kta affix, fem. ṭāp and deriv. irr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ghaṇṭa (घण्ट).— (akin to han), I. adj., f. ṭī, Sounding (?), Mahābhārata 12, 10377; 4, 188. Ii. f. ṭā, A bell, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 10, 33.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा).—[feminine] a bell; ghaṇṭikā [feminine] a small bell.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ghaṇṭa (घण्ट):—m. (for hantra?) Name of Śiva, [Mahābhārata xii, 10377 and 10419; Harivaṃśa 14884] (cf. ghaṭin)

2) a kind of dish (sort of sauce, vegetables made into a pulp and mixed with turmeric and mustard seeds and capsicums; cf. matsya-), [Horace H. Wilson]

3) Name of a Dānava, [Kathāsaritsāgara cxxi, 229]

4) Ghaṇṭā (घण्टा):—[from ghaṇṭa] a f. a bell, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc. (ifc. f(ā). , [Mahābhārata xiv; Rāmāyaṇa vi])

5) [v.s. ...] a plate of iron or mixed metal struck as a clock, [Horace H. Wilson] (cf. ghaṭī)

6) [v.s. ...] Bignonia suaveolens, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] Lida cordifolia or rhombifolia, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] Uraria lagopodioides, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] Achyranthes aspera, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [from ghaṇṭa] b f. of ṭa q.v.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ghaṇṭa (घण्ट):—(ṇṭaḥ) A sauce. 1. f. A bell.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Ghaṇṭa (घण्ट) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Ghaṃṭa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Ghanta in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Ghaṃṭā (घंटा) [Also spelled ghanta]:—(nm) a bell; gong; clock; an hour; ~[ghara] a clock-tower.

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Ghanta in Hindi refers in English to:—(nm) a bell; gong; clock; an hour; ~[ghara] a clock-tower..—ghanta (घंटा) is alternatively transliterated as Ghaṃṭā.

2) Ghanta in Hindi refers in English to:—(nf) density; solidity; compactness..—ghanta (घनता) is alternatively transliterated as Ghanatā.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Ghaṃṭa (घंट) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Ghaṇṭa.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Ghaṃṭā (ಘಂಟಾ):—[noun] (mus.) a musical mode in Karnāṭaka system derived from the major mode Naṭhabhairavi.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of ghanta in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

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