Gha: 16 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Gha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Gha (घ).—A technical term in the Jainendra Vyakarana for the term सर्व-नामस्थान (sarva-nāmasthāna) of Panini used for the first five case affixes सु, औ, अस्, अम्, ओ (su, au, as, am, o) and इ (i) (nom. and acc. pl. neuter gender); cf P. I. I. 42, 43.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Ghā.—d8ā (Chamba), a system by which the tiller receives one half of the produce. See ghād8otā. Note: ghā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Ghā.—d8aka, also called ghād8ī (Chamba); land cultivated on the ghād8ā system. Note: ghā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Ghā.—d8ī, cf. ghād8aka. Note: ghā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Ghā.—d8otā (Chamba), spoken of a land tilled on the condition that one half of the produce should go to the owner. See ghād8ā, etc. Note: ghā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

gha (घ).—The fourth consonant. It is the aspirate of the preceding letter, and is here represented by Gh.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

gha (घ).—The fourth consonant.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Gha (घ).—n. (Used only as the last member of comp.) Striking, killing, destroying; as in पाणिघ, राजघ (pāṇigha, rājagha) &c.

-ghaḥ 1 A bell.

2) Rattling, gurgling or tinkling noise; 'घः सूनुर्वह्निः पूषा नृपो गजः (ghaḥ sūnurvahniḥ pūṣā nṛpo gajaḥ) |' Enm.

-gham Sin; घं पापमुच्यते (ghaṃ pāpamucyate) ibid. The एकार्थनाममाला (ekārthanāmamālā) of राघव (rāghava) says : मेघे निदाघे किंकिण्यां घण्टायां घट्टने च घः । घं वाद्यामृतयोर्घा भूवार्ताघोरेषु च त्रिषु (meghe nidāghe kiṃkiṇyāṃ ghaṇṭāyāṃ ghaṭṭane ca ghaḥ | ghaṃ vādyāmṛtayorghā bhūvārtāghoreṣu ca triṣu) |

-ghā f.

1) A blow.

2) A tinkling ornament worn by women round the waist.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gha (घ).—The fourth consonant of the Sanskrit alphabet, being the aspirate of the preceding letter, and corresponding to G'h.

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Gha (घ).—m.

(-ghaḥ) 1. A bell. 2. A rattling or gurgling sound. f.

(-ghā) 1. A tinkling ornament worn by women round the waist. 2. Strikling, killing. 3. Wetting, sprinkling, E. han to kill, affix ḍa, and gha substituted for the radical letter, or the same affix, with ghṛ to sprinkle, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gha (घ).—usually ghā (old instr. of a pronomin. base = [Latin] ho, in ho-c, etc.), part., ved. Indeed, Chr. 287, 5 = [Rigveda.] i. 48, 5; Chr. 297, 19 = [Rigveda.] i. 112, 19.

— Cf. ha.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gha (घ).—1. ghā ([enclitic]) surely, indeed, even, at least; lays stress upon a [preceding] particle, pronoun, or preposition; is often followed by id or īm.

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Gha (घ).—2. (—°) striking, killing.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Gha (घ):—1. gha the 4th consonant of the Sanskṛt alphabet (aspirate of the preceding).

2) 2. gha ind. (used to lay stress on a word) at least, surely, verily, indeed, especially (= [Greek] γε), [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda v, 13, 10 & 11; vi, 1, 3.] In the Saṃhitā the final vowel is generally lengthened (ghā cf. [Pāṇini 6-3, 133])

3) as a rule it is preceded by other particles (uta, uto, uta vā, cid, na, ) or by a pronoun or a preposition

4) it is also found between iva and id

5) or between iva and id aha, or between and id

6) sometimes it occurs in the clause which depends on a conditional or relative sentence (e.g. ā ghā gamad yadi śravat, ‘he will surely come when he hears’ [Ṛg-veda i, 30, 8]), [i, 161, 8; viii, 46, 4.]

7) 3. gha mfn. (√han) ifc. ‘striking, killing’ cf. jīva-, tāḍa-, pāṇi-, rāja-, etc. (cf. also parigha)

8) Ghā (घा):—[from gha] a f. a stroke, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) Gha (घ):—4. gha m. a rattling or gurgling or tinkling sound, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) a bell, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) Ghā (घा):—[v.s. ...] b f. a tinkling ornament worn by women round the waist.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Gha (घ):—gha. The fourth consonant of the alphabet and aspirate of the preceding, ga g.

2) (ghaḥ) 1. m. A bell, a rattling sound. 1. f. ghā A tinkling ornament round the waist; striking.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Gha (घ) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Gha.

[Sanskrit to German]

Gha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Gha (घ) [Also spelled gh]:——the fourth consonant and the fourth member of the first pentad (i.e. [kavarga]) of the Devnagri: alphabet.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Gha (घ) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Gha.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Gha (ಘ):—[noun] (gen. pronounced with the vowel 'a') the eighteenth letter of Kannaḍa alphabet and the fourth consonant.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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