Gayaka, Gāyaka: 15 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Gayaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Gayak.

In Hinduism

Arthashastra (politics and welfare)

Source: Shodhganga: Kakati Ganapatideva and his times (artha)

Gāyaka (गायक, “musician”) is an official title designating one of the seventy-two officers (niyoga) of the Bāhattaraniyogādhipati circle, according to the Inscriptional glossary of Andhra Pradesh (Śāsana-śabdakośāmu). The bāhattaraniyoga-adhipati is the highest executive officer of this circle (including a Gāyaka). For example: During the reign of Gaṇapatideva, the area extending between Pānagal to Mārjavāḍi was entrusted to Gaṇḍapeṇḍāru Gangayasāhiṇi as Bāhattaraniyogādhipati. Later on, this office was entrusted to Kāyastha Jannigadeva.

Arthashastra book cover
context information

Arthashastra (अर्थशास्त्र, arthaśāstra) literature concerns itself with the teachings (shastra) of economic prosperity (artha) statecraft, politics and military tactics. The term arthashastra refers to both the name of these scientific teachings, as well as the name of a Sanskrit work included in such literature. This book was written (3rd century BCE) by by Kautilya, who flourished in the 4th century BCE.

Discover the meaning of gayaka in the context of Arthashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Gāyaka (गायक).—A warrior of Subrahmaṇya. (Śloka 67, Chapter 85, Śalya Parva).

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of gayaka in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Shodhganga: Temple management in the Āgamas

Gāyaka (गायक) refers to one of the Pañcācārya, representing members of the dance troupe employed in Śiva temples.—Performance of śuddhanṛtta or classical dance by Rudrakanyā accompanied by Pañcācārya [viz., Gāyaka] is known as saukhyakarma. This is recommended to be performed as part of nityotsava, sthāpana, prokṣana, prāyaścitta, adbhutaśānti, utsava, snapana, māsapūjā, homakarma, dhvajārohaṇa and other kāmya-karma. The Pañcācāryas are Nartaka, Mardaka, Gāyaka, Vāṃśika and Mauravika. Those who know the seven svaras and the science of music are known as Gāyaka.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of gayaka in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

gāyaka : (m.) a singer.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Gāyaka, (fr. next) a singer PvA.3 (naṭaka°). (Page 249)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of gayaka in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

gāyaka (गायक).—m ( H) A singer or vocalist.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

gāyaka (गायक).—m A singer or vocalist.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of gayaka in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Gāyaka (गायक).—[gai-ṇvul]

1) A singer, musician; न नटा न विटा न गायकाः (na naṭā na viṭā na gāyakāḥ) Bh.3.27.

2) An actor.

Derivable forms: gāyakaḥ (गायकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gāyaka (गायक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kī-kaṃ) Singing, one who sings. m.

(-kaḥ) A singer. E. gai to sing, ṇvul aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gāyaka (गायक).—i. e. gai + aka, m. A singer, [Rāmāyaṇa] 2, 65, 2.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gāyaka (गायक).—[masculine] ī [feminine] singer.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Gāyaka (गायक):—[from ] a mfn. one who sings, [Horace H. Wilson]

2) [v.s. ...] m. a singer, [Mahābhārata xii, xiv; Rāmāyaṇa; Bhāgavata-purāṇa iii, x; Bhartṛhari]

3) b gāyat See 3. .

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of gayaka in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: