Garudi, Gāruḍi, Garūḍī, Gāruḍī, Garuḍī: 12 definitions

Introduction:

Garudi means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Garūḍī (गरूडी):—One of the sixty-eight Rasauṣadhi, very powerful drugs known to be useful in alchemical processes related to mercury (rasa), according to Rasaprakāśa-sudhākara (chapter 9).

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Gāruḍi (गारुडि).—Sugrīva, the enemy of snakes in the Vaikārika hill.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 39. 40.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Gāruḍī (गारुडी) is another name for Vatsādanī, a medicinal plant identified with Cocculus hirsutus (broom creeper or ink berry) from the Menispermaceae or “moonseed” family of flowering plants, according to verse 3.102-104 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Gāruḍī and Vatsādanī, there are a total of six Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: eScholarship: Chapters 1-14 of the Hayasirsa Pancaratra

Gāruḍī (गारुडी) or Gāruḍin refers to “one who is a charmer (a dealer in antidotes or magical things)”, representing an undesirable characteristic of an Ācārya, according to the 9th-century Hayaśīrṣa-pañcarātra Ādikāṇḍa chapter 3.—The Lord said:—“I will tell you about the Sthāpakas endowed with perverse qualities. He should not construct a temple with those who are avoided in this Tantra. [...] He should not be stupid, have a fat lip, be one who spits, or have an indistinct voice, nor have a tumor, nor be a charmer (gāruḍī) nor be deformed, proud or deaf. [...] A god enshrined by any of these named above (viz., gāruḍī), is in no manner a giver of fruit. If a building for Viṣṇu is made anywhere by these excluded types (viz., gāruḍī) then that temple will not give rise to enjoyment and liberation and will yield no reward, of this there is no doubt”.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Garuḍī (गरुडी) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Garuḍa forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Vāyucakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the vāyucakra refers to one of the three divisions of the dharma-puṭa (‘dharma layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Garuḍī] and Vīras are dark blue in color; they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Gāruḍī (गारुडी) is the name of a Vidyā, according to chapter 4.1 [śreyāṃsanātha-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly:—“[...] Jvalanajaṭin, delighted, taught vidyās to them (i.e., Acala and Tripṛṣṭha), dressed in white, concentrated in meditation. Recalling the first syllables of the mantras, the two brothers passed seven nights, their minds devoted to one thing. On the seventh day, the lord of serpents (Śeṣa) having trembled, the vidyās approached Bala and Upendra absorbed in meditation. The vidyās [viz., Gāruḍī], and others said, ‘We are in your power’. Both completed meditation, though the vidyās had been won. Everything is attracted spontaneously by merit. What should not belong to the noble? [...]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

gāruḍī (गारुडी) [or गारोडी, gārōḍī].—m (gārūḍa) A snake-charmer: also a juggler or conjurer.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

gāruḍī (गारुडी).—m A snake-charmer; also a juggler or conjurer.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gāruḍī (गारुडी).—f. (-ḍī) Hog-weed, (Boerhavia diffusa alata.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Garuḍī (गरुडी):—[from garuḍa] f. of ḍa q.v.

2) Gāruḍī (गारुडी):—[from gāruḍa] f. Name of a creeper, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gāruḍī (गारुडी):—(ḍī) 3. f. Hogweed.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Garuḍi (ಗರುಡಿ):—

1) [noun] a place for living; a shelter; an abode.

2) [noun] a room or building equipped for physical training and athletic games and sports; a gymnasium.

3) [noun] physical or mental exertion; work; toil; labour.

4) [noun] a shrine in a village for the departed soul.

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Gāruḍi (ಗಾರುಡಿ):—

1) [noun] the art of charming and catching snakes.

2) [noun] the use of charms, spells, and rituals in seeking or pretending to cause or control events or govern certain natural or supernatural forces; magic.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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