Garjat: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Garjat means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Garjat (गर्जत्) [or rāvayat?] (Cf. Garjantī) refers to “one who roars”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “[...] Very fierce, she has fangs and, very terrible, she is frightening. Her gaze severe and fixed, she resides in her own sacred seat and is horrific. She, the mother of Kula, roars with the Great Sound [i.e., garjatmahānādena garjantī rāvayantī]. She is the Kālī of the great Bhairava. Her lips are (red like the) Bimba (fruit) and she is greedy for blood. She chews on human flesh and drinks blood, excrement and urine. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Garjat (गर्जत्) refers to “one who rumbles” and is used to describe Bhairava, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 10.1-7ab, while describing the appearance and worship of Bhairava]—“Now, at this moment, I shall explain the distinct appearance of Bhairava, [who] resembles an ointment [that clears the eye]. He has a nature that burns up and dissolves all things. Five-faced, atop a corpse, ten-armed [and] terrible, he resembles troops with demon mouths. He rumbles (garjatgarjantaṃ), [producing] a terrible noise, speaks with a gaping mouth [adorned with] with large tusks, [his face] bent in a frown. [...] Having worshipped Bhairava, [the Mantrin] remembers being joined in union [with] him, [in the same way as] dissolution in fire”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Garjat (गर्जत्) refers to “roaring” (in battle), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.4.10 (“Boasting of Tāraka”).—Accordingly, as Tāraka-Asura fought with Kārttikeya: “[...] Both appeared to possess plenty of practice. Both had the desire to gain the upper hand. Both fought on foot, had wonderful forms and features and were equally courageous. With massive heaps of fatal missiles they hit each other. They had various ways of attack. They roared (garjat). They exhibited their all exploits. The onlookers, the gods, the Gandharvas and the Kinnaras were much surprised. They did not speak anything there. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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