Gandhahastin, aka: Gandha-hastin; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Gandhahastin means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Gandhahastin (गन्धहस्तिन्) is one of the sixteen bodhisattvas appearing in the Vajradhātu-mahāmaṇḍala, according to the Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī v5.38-41. The Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī (literally, ‘an explanation of the nāma-mantras’) is a commentary (ṭīkā) on the Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti.

Gandhahastin is a name of Mañjuśrī (the embodiement of non-dual knowledge) and, together with other names, forms the core essence of the Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti. The Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī provides the practitioner a sādhana (‘meditative practice’) to turn these names into mantras. These mantras are chanted for the benefit of all beings, and then placed and contemplated in the Vajradhātu-mahāmaṇḍala, which is an extended version of the Vajradhātu-maṇḍala.

The Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti (lit. ‘chanting of the names of Mañjuśrī’) is a short but influential Buddhist tantra, containing the essence of the teachings of Śākyamuni (the historical Buddha). It was composed by Vilāsavajra in the 8th century and contains 3000 verses in the anuṣṭubh meter.

Source: Wisdom Library: Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti
Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Gandhahastin in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [G] · next »

Gandhahastin (गन्धहस्तिन्).—m. 'the scentelephant', an elephant of the best kind; यस्य गन्धं समाघ्राय न तिष्ठन्ति प्रतिद्विपाः । स वै गन्धगजो नाम नृपतेर्विजयावहः (yasya gandhaṃ samāghrāya na tiṣṭhanti pratidvipāḥ | sa vai gandhagajo nāma nṛpatervijayāvahaḥ) || Pālakāpyam; शमयति गजानन्यान्गन्धद्विपः कलभोऽपि सन् (śamayati gajānanyāngandhadvipaḥ kalabho'pi san) V.5. 18; R.6.7;17.7; गन्धेन जेतुः प्रमुखागतस्य गन्धद्विपस्येव मतङ्गजौघः (gandhena jetuḥ pramukhāgatasya gandhadvipasyeva mataṅgajaughaḥ) | Ki.17.17.

Gandhahastin is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms gandha and hastin (हस्तिन्). See also (synonyms): gandhebha, gandhagaja, gandhadvipa.

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Gandhahastin (गन्धहस्तिन्).—m. a scent-elephant; यस्य गन्धं समाघ्राय न तिष्ठन्ति प्रतिद्विपाः । तं गन्धहस्तिनं प्राहुर्नृपतोर्विजयावहम् (yasya gandhaṃ samāghrāya na tiṣṭhanti pratidvipāḥ | taṃ gandhahastinaṃ prāhurnṛpatorvijayāvaham) || Pālakāpyam.

Gandhahastin is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms gandha and hastin (हस्तिन्).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Gandhahastin (गन्धहस्तिन्).—n. of a Bodhisattva: Mvy 704; AsP 474.2; Sukh 92.11; Samādh p. 36, line 1. The word occurs in Sanskrit and AMg. (°hatthī) in the sense of an elephant in the climax of must, i.e. in the fourth stage of must, de- scribed in Mātaṅgalīlā ix.15; this meaning is also found Mvy 8209, where °hasti-balam is contrasted with 8208 prākṛta- hasti-balam, strength of an ordinary elephant.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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