Gamini, Gāminī: 2 definitions

Introduction:

Gamini means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Gāminī (गामिनी) (Cf. Gāmin) refers to “she who moves” (toward union with one’s own will), according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 10.7cd-17ab, while describing the worship of Bhairavī and Bhairava]—“[Bhairavī] has the appearance of vermillion or lac. [...] [She is] called Icchāśakti [and she] moves toward union with one’s own will (svacchanda-utsaṅga-gāminī). Having celebrated this form, [the mantrin] thinks of her as Aghoreśī. In all Tantras [this] is taught and secret. It is not made clear. My abode is visible by anyone on earth, [but] difficult to obtain. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: MDPI Books: The Ocean of Heroes

Gāminī (गामिनी) refers to “that which runs” (to all regions in one’s body), according to chapter 50 of the 10th-century Ḍākārṇava-tantra: one of the last Tibetan Tantric scriptures belonging to the Buddhist Saṃvara tradition consisting of 51 chapters.—Accordingly, “Now, I will explain the characteristic of Mahākaṅkāla. [A practitioner,] devoting himself to the yoga of the donkey-formed, can stop a rush of thought. [The channel of] the balanced bodily constituents is well meditated on the seat [located] at the top of a mountain (viz, at the top of the head). [It] faces downwards, appears to be the stalk of a lotus, and runs (gāminī) to all [regions in one’s body] as [spreading] streaks of lightning. [...]”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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