Gajapippali, Gajapippalī, Gaja-pippali: 5 definitions

Introduction

Gajapippali means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous (G) next»] — Gajapippali in Ayurveda glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

1) Gajapippalī (गजपिप्पली):—A Sanskrit word referring to the “Piper chaba”, a species of flowering vine from the Piperaceae (pepper) family of flowering plants. It is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā. 

This plant (Gajapippalī) is also mentioned as a medicine used for the treatment of all major fevers (jvara), as described in the Jvaracikitsā (or “the treatment of fever”) which forms the first chapter of the Sanskrit work called Mādhavacikitsā. In this work, the plant is mentioned being part of the Pippalīdvaya group of medicinal drugs.

2) Gajapippalī (गजपिप्पली):—A Sanskrit word referring to the “Scindapsus officinalis”, a species of plant from the Araceae (arum) family of flowering plants. It is also known as Gajakṛṣṇā. In English, the plant is known as the “Oriental cashew”. It is a large epiphytic climber growing on trees and rocks in forests throughout India. The leaves are large growing up to 25cm in length. It has leathery flowers that are densely arranged in the spandix which is cylindrical in shape. The fruits are berries.

Source: Ancient Science of Life: Botanical identification of plants described in Mādhava Cikitsā

Gajapippalī (गजपिप्पली) refers to the medicinal plant Scindapsus officinalis Schott., and is used in the treatment of atisāra (diarrhoea), according to the 7th century Mādhavacikitsā chapter 2. Atisāra refers to a condition where there are three or more loose or liquid stools (bowel movements) per day or more stool than normal.  The second chapter of the Mādhavacikitsā explains several preparations [including Gajapippalī] through 60 Sanskrit verses about treating this problem.

Note: The fruits of Cavya (Piper chaba Hunter Syn. Piper retrofractum Vahl.) are also called as Gajapippalī, as Pippalī always belongs to family Piperaceae.

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context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (G) next»] — Gajapippali in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Gajapippalī (गजपिप्पली).—Name of a plant (Scindapsus Officinalis; Mar. gajapiṃpaḷī, miravela).

Gajapippalī is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms gaja and pippalī (पिप्पली).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gajapippalī (गजपिप्पली).—f. (-lī) A plant bearing a seed which resembles pepper, (Pothos officinalis) E. gaja an elephant, and pippalī long pepper; considered to be a large species of pepper: see similar names, as karipippalī, ibhakaṇā, &c.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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