Gajakacchapa, aka: Gaja-kacchapa; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Gajakacchapa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Gajakachchhapa.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Gajakacchapa in Shilpashastra glossary... « previous · [G] · next »

Gajakacchapa (गजकच्छप) is found as a sculpture at the temple of Lokeśvara, north entrance, eastern pillar, north façade.—Many scholars of yore like C. Sivaramamurti and others have identified this image as “Gajendramokṣa” where Viṣṇu comes and rescues the life of the elephant. The story of Gajakachhapa occurs in the Mahābhārata, in Ādiparvan. The context is that Kadru and Vinatā, the two daughters of Dakṣa were married to sage Kaśyapa.

In the representation of Lokeśvara temple, Viṣṇu seated on the back of Garuḍa, is ready to throw his discus on the Tortoise to free the Elephant. The Elephant, with its head up holds a lotus in its trunk as if it is going to offer it to Viṣṇu before breathing his last. This image is a representation in between the usual representation of Gajendramokṣa and Gajakachapa.

Source: Archaeological Survey of India: Śaiva monuments at Paṭṭadakal (śilpa)
Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 197 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Gaja
Gaja (गज) or Gajahasta refers to “elephant trunk” and represents one of the four Elirkai gestur...
Kacchapa
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Gajadanta
Gajadanta (गजदन्त).—1) an elephant's tusk, ivory; कार्योलङ्कार- विधिर्गजदन्तेन प्रशस्तेन (kāryo...
Gajapati
Gajapati.—(IE 8-2; EI 9, 30; CII 4; HD), ‘the lord of elephants’; officer in charge of the elep...
Gajavaktra
Gajavaktra (गजवक्त्र).—epithets of Gaṇeśa; Bṛ. S.58.58; Ks.1.44. Derivable forms: gajavaktraḥ (...
Gajasura
Gajāsura (गजासुर).—The sages of Darukavana pine forest sent Gajāsura (elephant demon) ...
Gajaputa
Gajapuṭa (गजपुट).—a small hole in the ground for fire. Derivable forms: gajapuṭaḥ (गजपुटः).Gaja...
Gajanana
Gajānana (गजानन).—epithets of Ganeśa. Derivable forms: gajānanaḥ (गजाननः).Gajānana is a Sanskri...
Gajasana
Gajāśana (गजाशन).—the religious fig tree (aśvattha). -nam the root of a lotus. Derivable forms:...
Diggaja
Diggaja (दिग्गज).—m. one of the eight elephants said to guard and preside over the eight cardin...
Gajendra
Gajendra (गजेन्द्र).—1) an excellent elephant, a lordly elephant; किं रुष्टासि गजेन्द्रमन्दगमने...
Gajagati
Gajagati (गजगति).—f. 1) a stately, majestic gait like that of an elephant. 2) a woman with such...
Gajaraja
Gajarāja (गजराज).—a lordly or noble elephant. Derivable forms: gajarājaḥ (गजराजः).Gajarāja is a...
Gajadhyaksha
Gajādhyakṣa (गजाध्यक्ष).—superintendent of elephants; Bri. S.86.34. Derivable forms: gajādhyakṣ...
Gajagamini
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