Gajaganesha, aka: Gajagaṇeśa, Gaja-ganesha; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Gajaganesha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Gajagaṇeśa can be transliterated into English as Gajaganesa or Gajaganesha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana

[Gajaganesha in Purana glossaries]

Gajagaṇeśa (गजगणेश) is short for Gaja (elephant-form), one of the fifty-six vināyakas according to the Kāśīkhaṇḍa from the Skanda-purāṇa (4 2.57). Worshipping this vināyaka (gaṇeśa) is part of a sacred pilgrimage (yātrā) route which centers around Kāśī (Vārāṇasī): a holy city in India. His esoteric position within the Kāśīmaṇḍala and the geographic position of his actual shrine is given by Rana Singh in his Banaras (p. 189) (source).

Gaja and the other vināyakas (gaṇeśas) are described in the Skandapurāṇa (the largest of the eighteen mahāpurāṇas), which narrates the details and legends surrounding numerous holy pilgrimages (tīrtha-māhātmya) throughout India. It is composed of over 81,000 metrical verses with the core text dating from the before the 4th-century CE.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Skanda-purāṇa
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of gajaganesha or gajaganesa in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 458 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Ganesha
Gaṇeśa (गणेश) is the name of an ancient Tibetan tantric deity.—The Newari people of Nepal worsh...
Gaja
Gaja (गज).—[gaj-made ac]1) An elephant; कचाचितौ विश्वगिवागजौ गजौ (kacācitau viśvagivāgajau gaja...
Gajavaktra
Gajavaktra (गजवक्त्र).—epithets of Gaṇeśa; Bṛ. S.58.58; Ks.1.44. Derivable forms: gajavaktraḥ (...
Gajadanta
Gajadanta (गजदन्त).—1) an elephant's tusk, ivory; कार्योलङ्कार- विधिर्गजदन्तेन प्रशस्तेन (kāryo...
Gajasura
Gajāsura (गजासुर).—The sages of Darukavana pine forest sent Gajāsura (elephant demon) ...
Gajaputa
Gajapuṭa (गजपुट).—a small hole in the ground for fire. Derivable forms: gajapuṭaḥ (गजपुटः).Gaja...
Gajanana
Gajānana (गजानन).—epithets of Ganeśa. Derivable forms: gajānanaḥ (गजाननः).Gajānana is a Sanskri...
Gajapati
Gajapati (गजपति) was a friend of Vikramāditya: an ancient king from Pāṭaliputra, according to t...
Gajavadana
Gajavadana (गजवदन).—epithets of Gaṇeśa; Bṛ. S.58.58; Ks.1.44. Derivable forms: gajavadanaḥ (गजव...
Diggaja
Diggaja (दिग्गज).—m. one of the eight elephants said to guard and preside over the eight cardin...
Gajendra
Gajendra (गजेन्द्र).—1) an excellent elephant, a lordly elephant; किं रुष्टासि गजेन्द्रमन्दगमने...
Gajagati
Gajagati (गजगति).—f. 1) a stately, majestic gait like that of an elephant. 2) a woman with such...
Gajadhyaksha
Gajādhyakṣa (गजाध्यक्ष).—superintendent of elephants; Bri. S.86.34. Derivable forms: gajādhyakṣ...
Gajagamini
Gajagāminī (गजगामिनी).—a woman having a stately elephant-like gait; याता सुदूरमधुना गजगामिनी सा...
Gajasana
Gajāsana (गजासन) is the name of an āsana (posture) described in the Haṭhābhyāsapaddhati (25).—A...

Relevant text