Gajadhyaksha, aka: Gajādhyakṣa, Gaja-adhyaksha; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Gajadhyaksha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Gajādhyakṣa can be transliterated into English as Gajadhyaksa or Gajadhyaksha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Gajadhyaksha in Purana glossary... « previous · [G] · next »

Gajādhyakṣa (गजाध्यक्ष).—The superintendent of elephants and his qualifications.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 215. 36.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Gajadhyaksha in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [G] · next »

Gajādhyakṣa (गजाध्यक्ष) is the Sanskrit name of a deity presiding over Karṇikāra, one of the sixty-eight places hosting a svāyambhuvaliṅga, which is one of the most sacred of liṅgas according to the Śaivāgamas. The list of sixty-eight svāyambhuvaliṅgas and presiding deities (eg., Gajādhyakṣa) is found in the commentary on the Jirṇoddhāra-daśaka by Nigamajñānadeva. The word liṅga refers to a symbol used in the worship of Śiva and is used thoughout Śaiva literature, such as the sacred Āgamas.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Gajadhyaksha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [G] · next »

Gajādhyakṣa (गजाध्यक्ष).—superintendent of elephants; Bri. S.86.34.

Derivable forms: gajādhyakṣaḥ (गजाध्यक्षः).

Gajādhyakṣa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms gaja and adhyakṣa (अध्यक्ष).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 268 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Gaja
Gaja (गज) or Gajahasta refers to “elephant trunk” and represents one of the four Elirkai gestur...
Gajapati
Gajapati (गजपति).—m. (-tiḥ) 1. A large state elephant. 2. A king. E. gaja, and pati a master.
Adhyaksha
Adhyakṣa.—(EI 24; CII 4), the head of a department; the superintendent of a department; a super...
Dharmadhyaksha
Dharm-ādhyakṣa.—(EI 15; HD), generally explained as ‘a judge’; but he was probably also the sup...
Gajakarna
Gajakarṇa (गजकर्ण).—‘elephant's ear’, as symbol of imper-manence (for some reason which is obsc...
Gajadanta
Gajadanta (गजदन्त).—1) an elephant's tusk, ivory; कार्योलङ्कार- विधिर्गजदन्तेन प्रशस्तेन (kāryo...
Koshadhyaksha
Koṣādhyakṣa (कोषाध्यक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) 1. A treasurer. A minister of finance. 2. Kuvera. E. koṣa,...
Gajavaktra
Gajavaktra (गजवक्त्र).—epithets of Gaṇeśa; Bṛ. S.58.58; Ks.1.44. Derivable forms: gajavaktraḥ (...
Gajasura
Gajāsura (गजासुर).—The sages of Darukavana pine forest sent Gajāsura (elephant demon) ...
Gajaputa
Gajapuṭa (गजपुट).—a small hole in the ground for fire. Derivable forms: gajapuṭaḥ (गजपुटः).Gaja...
Gajasana
Gajāśana (गजाशन).—m. (-naḥ) The religious fig tree. f. (-nā) 1. Hemp, (Cannabis sativa.) 2. The...
Diggaja
Diggaja.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘eight’. Eight poets patronised by Kṛṣṇadevarāya were called the aṣṭa-digg...
Dhanadhyaksha
Dhanādhyakṣa (धनाध्यक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) 1. A name of Kuyera. 2. A treasurer. E. dhana wealth, adhy...
Gajanana
Gajānana (गजानन).—epithets of Ganeśa. Derivable forms: gajānanaḥ (गजाननः).Gajānana is a Sanskri...
Ashvadhyaksha
Aśv-ādhyakṣa.—(EI 18), superintendent of stables or cavalry officer; cf. Aśva-sādhanika, Aśvapa...

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