Fruit: 4 definitions

Introduction:

Fruit means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Images (photo gallery)

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Shodhganga: Elements of Art and Architecture in the Trtiyakhanda of the Visnudharmottarapurana (natya)

Fruits are associated with Kāṅgūla-hasta: one of the twenty-two Single-hand Gestures (in Indian Dramas) (known as asaṃyuktahastas), according to the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa, an ancient Sanskrit text which (being encyclopedic in nature) deals with a variety of cultural topics such as arts, architecture, music, grammar and astronomy.—In kāṅgūlahasta, the middle finger is set between the forefinger and thumb while the ring finger is bent and the little finger is quite upward. According to the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa, the kāṅgūla posture is used to denote fruits. In the Abhinayadarpaṇa, this posture is said to indicate things as fruits, bell, birds like cakora and cātaka, coconut etc.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

Discover the meaning of fruit in the context of Natyashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Shodhganga: Elements of Art and Architecture in the Trtiyakhanda of the Visnudharmottarapurana (shilpa)

Fruits (and Crops) are associated with the Autumn Season, which follows specific guidelines of ancient Indian Painting (citra), according to the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa, an ancient Sanskrit text which (being encyclopedic in nature) deals with a variety of cultural topics such as arts, architecture, music, grammar and astronomy.—The Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa gives some instructions to make the picture of every season beautiful and natural. In the season of Śarat i.e., autumn, the trees are filled with fruits and fields are filled with crops. The portrait of the autumn season is prescribed to be depicted with the picture of the earth covered with the plants full of fruits and the fields filled with plenty of ripe grains. [...] Thus, the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa addresses various elements of nature, such as fruits and crops in the autumn season, since painting has much connection with time, mood and activity.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

Discover the meaning of fruit in the context of Shilpashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Yoga (school of philosophy)

Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation by Jason Birch

Fruit is denoted by the Sanskrit term Phala, according to the the Amanaska Yoga treatise dealing with meditation, absorption, yogic powers and liberation.—Accordingly, as Īśvara says to Vāmadeva: “[...] Just as fruit (phala) manifests from a flower [and in so doing,] is the destroyer of the flower, so the highest reality manifests from the body [and in so doing,] is the destroyer of the body. [...]”.

Yoga book cover
context information

Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

Discover the meaning of fruit in the context of Yoga from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Fruit is suitable for ascetics only if purified by some means, according to chapter 1.1 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra: an ancient Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three illustrious persons in Jainism. Accordingly, “[...] some one brought the merchant [Dhana] a dish filled with ripe mangoes that looked like fragments of a twilight-cloud. Then Dhana, whose mind was filled with delight, said, “Favor me and accept this fruit.” The Sūri [viz., Ācārya [Dharmaghoṣa] said, ‘We are not allowed to even touch such fruit, etc., that has not been purified, to say nothing of eating it, O layman’.”

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of fruit in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Related products

Help me keep this site Ad-Free

For over a decade, this site has never bothered you with ads. I want to keep it that way. But I humbly request your help to keep doing what I do best: provide the world with unbiased truth, wisdom and knowledge.

Let's make the world a better place together!

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: