Eranda, Eraṇḍa: 12 definitions

Introduction

Eranda means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Eraṇḍa (एरण्ड) is a Sanskrit word referring to Ricinus communis (castor-oil-plant), a plant species in the Euphorbiaceae family. Certain plant parts of Eraṇḍa are eaten as a vegetable (śāka), according to Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work. The plant is therefore part of the Śākavarga group of medicinal plants, referring to the “group of vegetables/pot-herbs”. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic value of the plant. The plant has anti-inflammatory properties and the medicinal usage includes protection from liver damage.

According to the Rājanighaṇṭu (verse 8.55-57), the castor-oil-plant (eraṇḍa) has three varieties with a total of 30 synonyms:

The Śvetairaṇḍa variety has 11 synonyms:

  1. Sitairaṇḍa,
  2. Citra,
  3. Gandharvahastaka,
  4. Āmaṇḍa,
  5. Taruṇa,
  6. Śukla,
  7. Vātāri,
  8. Dīrghakaṇṭaka,
  9. Pañcāṅgula,
  10. Vardhamāna,
  11. Ruvuka.

The Raktairaṇḍa variety has 14 synonyms:

  1. Vyāghra,
  2. Hastikarṇī,
  3. Ruvu,
  4. Uruvuka,
  5. Nāgakarṇa,
  6. Cañcu,
  7. Uttānapatraka,
  8. Karaparṇa,
  9. Yācanaka,
  10. Snigdha,
  11. Vyāghradala,
  12. Tatkara,
  13. Citravīja,
  14. Hrasvairaṇḍa.

The Sthūlairaṇḍa variety has 2 synonyms:

  1. Mahairaṇḍa,
  2. Mahāpañcāṅgula.

This plant (Eraṇḍa) is also mentioned as a medicine used for the treatment of all major fevers (jvara), as described in the Jvaracikitsā (or “the treatment of fever”) which forms the first chapter of the Sanskrit work called Mādhavacikitsā..

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Eraṇḍa (एरण्ड) refers to “castor” which is used to prepare oils (taila) from according to the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—Taila-prakaraṇa describes the properties of the oil prepared from [viz., eraṇḍa (castor), etc.].

The food-utensils that are made of Eraṇḍa-patra (castor oil plant leaf) have the following dietetic effects: “hanyāt paramacākṣuṣyaṃ” (greatly beneficial for the eyes) “laghu dīpanapācanam” (light and stimulates the digestive fire), vātaghna, kṛmighna and pittakṛt (alleviates vāta,kills worms and aggravates bile).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Buddhism

Eraṇḍa (एरण्ड)—One of the field-crops mentioned in the Jātakas.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

eraṇda : (m.) the plant Palma Christi form the seeds of which castor oil is extracted.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Eraṇḍa, (dial.?) the castor oil plant Nd2 680II.; J.II, 440. Cp. elaṇḍa. (Page 161)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ēraṇḍa (एरंड).—m f (S) Castor oil-plant, Palma Christi or Ricinus communis. Pr. ōsāḍa gāṃvīṃ ē0 baḷī. Pr. thōra vāḍhalā ē0 tara kāya hōīla ikṣudaṇḍa? ēraṇḍāsārakhā vāḍhaṇēṃ To shoot up rapidly--animal or plant. With implication of overgrowing its strength.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ēraṇḍa (एरंड).—m ḍī f Castor-oil plant. ēra़ṇḍāsārakhā vāḍhaṇēṃ To shoot up rapidly-animal or plant. With implication of over- growing its strength. (ēraṇḍācēṃ guṛhāḷa n

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Eraṇḍa (एरण्ड).—The castor-oil plant; (a small tree with a scanty number of leaves); and hence the proverb: निरस्तपादपे देशे एरण्डोऽपि द्रुमायते (nirastapādape deśe eraṇḍo'pi drumāyate).

-ṇḍā Long pepper.

Derivable forms: eraṇḍaḥ (एरण्डः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Eraṇḍa (एरण्ड).—m.

(-ṇḍaḥ) The castor-oil plant, (Palma christi or Ricinus communis. ) f. (-ṇḍī) Long pepper. E. ir to go, &c. āṅ prefixed, aṇḍac affix, fem. affix ṅīṣ; also with kan added eraṇḍaka.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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